Styrax

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Related to Pamphilia: Pamphylia

sto·rax

(stō'raks),
A liquid balsam obtained from the wood and inner bark of Liquidamber orientalis, a tree of Asia Minor, or L. styraciflua (family Hamamelidaceae); has been used in the treatment of chronic inflammation of the mucous membranes, and externally for scabies.
Synonym(s): styrax
[G. styrax, a sweet-smelling gum]

Styrax

Herbal medicine
An African tree, the resin of which is antimicrobial, astringent and expectorant; it is used externally for skin cuts, dryness and infections, including shingles, ringworm and other conditions; given its bitterness, is rarely used internally, and then only as a steam inhalation to loosen mucus and phlegm—e.g., in children with croup.
References in periodicals archive ?
The internal is the world; Pamphilia becomes subject and object, lover and beloved; her private internal self becomes externalized and public through the published trope of the dream.
As a female lover, Wrath's Pamphilia destabilizes the conventional expectations of the blazon, not only by gazing on herself, but also by refusing to create the "collection of exquisitely beautiful disassociated objects" (Vickers 266) conventionally expected in a sixteenth-century love sonnet.
In Wrath's sequence, Pamphilia becomes the heart/hart which is burned and torn--"martir'd"--to desire.
While Pamphilia is represented by her bleeding heart, the identity of the beloved, Amphilanthus, is displaced onto the character of Cupid, the perpetrator of love.
However, Wroth later returns to Venus's influence, showing Pamphilia rejecting the goddess's apparently misleading ways as she strives towards calming and accepting her passion, proclaiming:
This rejection gives Pamphilia a chance to speak more directly to Cupid, the metaphorical object and true focus of her forbidden heterosexual desire, suggesting the narrator's progress in coming to terms with, and uncovering the true nature of, her dream.
Wroth's Pamphilia, while not making such excursions into the fragmentary public world, similarly exhibits a tension between fragmentation and self-awareness as she divulges the extent of her private torture in P41:
Pamphilia continues to identify herself with her suffering heart, addressing it as it experiences further developments on the "paines" begun in her opening sonnet.
Despite and because of her construction of absolute privacy, Pamphilia continues to be wracked by pain; the written word exposes her in her tortured isolation, giving her no security in this revelation that receives the public gaze.
For example in P39 Pamphilia describes the purpose of the inverted, private gaze: "Take heed mine eyes, how you your lookes doe cast / Least they beetray my harts most secrett thought" (1-2).
Roberts, contains both The Countesse of Mountgomeries Urania and Pamphilia to Amphilanthus (1621), and makes this important copy publidy available to scholars for the first time.
She has chosen, appropriately, to use the holograph manuscript of Pamphilia to Amphilanthus in the Folger Library as copy-text since it shows the author's accidentals and corrections; for the Urania poems she uses the 1621 printed text and the unique Newberry manuscript of the unpublished Part II.