Styrax

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Related to Pamphilia: Pamphylia

sto·rax

(stō'raks),
A liquid balsam obtained from the wood and inner bark of Liquidamber orientalis, a tree of Asia Minor, or L. styraciflua (family Hamamelidaceae); has been used in the treatment of chronic inflammation of the mucous membranes, and externally for scabies.
Synonym(s): styrax
[G. styrax, a sweet-smelling gum]

Styrax

Herbal medicine
An African tree, the resin of which is antimicrobial, astringent and expectorant; it is used externally for skin cuts, dryness and infections, including shingles, ringworm and other conditions; given its bitterness, is rarely used internally, and then only as a steam inhalation to loosen mucus and phlegm—e.g., in children with croup.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Wroth's sonnet, the eyes have to guard against the heart's thought, and by the end of the poem Pamphilia seems able to gaze upon her love without revealing anything about her desire, except to herself.
She was particularly influenced by the writings of her uncle, Sir Philip Sidney, whose Astrophil and Stella has been frequently acknowledged as an important model for Pamphilia to Amphilanthus.
The epigraph is derived from the words of the brother who disguises himself as a eunuch and rapes Pamphilia, but it seems it is Phaedria's goals that are inhibited and in whom a complex subjectivity is formed; it is also in the outcome of Phaedria's opening himself up that the poem reflects this latter development of a complex structure around unnamed forces.
In her sonnet sequence Pamphilia to Amphilanthus, for example, Wroth locates authority with the female speaker by undermining the male beloved through an insistent counterpoising of speech and silence, absence and presence (speech and presence in themselves being traditional male tools for the control of women).
We have in her heroine Pamphilia the figure of an intelligent and discziminating reader of fiction, and in the experiences of her other female characters a powerful diversity of responses to the pressures on women to conform to the patriarchal norms of early seventeenth-century society.
Pritchard has fruitfully developed the pioneering work of Gary Waller, who in 1977 published the first old-spelling edition of Pamphilia to Amphilanthus, and the late Josephine Roberts, whose impressively researched old-spelling edition of the complete poems appeared in 1983.
Munroe then shifts to yet another imagined garden space in the form of Lady Mary Wroth's sequence of sonnets entitled Pamphilia To Amphilanthus (1621).
Lost children stand, she asserts, at the intersection of geographical and emotional concerns in the Urania but appear differently in the first, printed part and the second, manuscript one, where they are preparing to succeed Urania, Pamphilia, and Amphilanthus.
Pamphilia to Amphilanthus (in which the female figure usurps the power of words) but also even some of Petrarch's own lamentations of male inadequacy.
In a sonnet, the central conceit of which is so continuously worked through all the fourteen lines arid is so variously displayed that it at least begins to conform to what some critics have made the standard for a metaphysical conceit, Wroth compares herself in love to West Indians worshiping a sun god: This is Sonnet #22 of Pamphilia to Amphilanthus:
George Herbert, who, according to the DNB, was 'constantly at court' at this time, may well have looked with particular interest at the Petrarchist sonnet-sequence Pamphilia to Amphilanthus, the first published by an English woman, that concluded the volume.
The book's thesis is extrapolated further in Chapter 4 through an analysis of Mary Wroth's sonnet sequence Pamphilia to Amphilanthus (1621).