palindrome

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pal·in·drome

(pal'in-drōm),
In molecular biology, a self-complementary nucleic acid sequence; a sequence identical to its complementary strand, if both are "read" in the same 5' to 3' direction, or inverted repeating sequences running in opposite directions (for example, 5'-AGTTGA-3') on either side of an axis of symmetry; palindromes occur at sites of important reactions (for example, binding sites, sites cleaved by restriction enzymes); imperfect palindromes exist, as do interrupted palindromes that allow the formation of loops.
[G. palindromos, a running backward]

palindrome

(păl′ĭn-drōm′)
n.
A segment of double-stranded DNA in which the nucleotide sequence of one strand reads in reverse order to that of the complementary strand.

pal′in·dro′mic (-drō′mĭk, -drŏm′ĭk) adj.

palindrome

[pal′indrōm′]
Etymology: Gk, palin + dromos, course
a segment of DNA in which identical or almost identical sequences of bases run in opposite directions of the complementary strands. Palindromes are often sites for attack by restriction endonucleases.
Etymology A word, phrase, number or other sequence of units that can be read the same way in either direction—adjustment of punctuation and spaces between words is permitted
Molecular biology Inverted repeat A sequence of duplex DNA or RNA with dyad symmetry that reads the same in the 5’ to 3’ direction on complementary strands; DNA-binding proteins may recognise palindromes.

pal·in·drome

(pal'in-drōm)
molecular biology A self-complementary nucleic acid sequence; a sequence identical to its complementary strand, if both are "read" in the same 5'-3' direction, or inverted repeating sequences running in opposite directions (but same 5'- to 3'- direction) on either side of an axis of symmetry; palindromes occur at sites of important reactions.
[G. palindromos, a running backward]
Palindromeclick for a larger image
Fig. 243 Palindrome .

palindrome

a sequence in double-stranded nucleic acids that reads the same on both strands when reading one strand from left to right and the other from right to left (i.e. both strands are read 5′ 3′). See Fig. 243 .In a single-stranded molecule, COMPLEMENTARY BASE PAIRING can occur when the chain is folded back (See also HAIRPIN). Palindromes occur in, for example, many operator sequences (see OPERON MODEL), transcription terminator sequences (see TRANSCRIPTION).and most recognition sites for RESTRICTION ENZYMES.

palindrome

literally, something that reads the same backwards as forwards. In nucleic acid biochemistry palindromic sequences of 4 to 10 or more base pairs occur not infrequently. These are of interest because they are recognition sites for cleavage by restriction endonuclease enzymes; responsible for secondary structures in nucleic acids such as the folding of RNA molecules or the hairpin structures found at the termini of the single-stranded DNA genome of parvoviruses.

interrupted palindrome
restriction enzymes such as BglI recognize sequences which are interrupted palindromes, e.g. GCNNN↓NGGC where N is any nucleotide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Palindromes are numbers, words or phrases that read the same backwards and forwards.
A computer program was written to construct SDG numbers and exclude any regular palindromes.
Palindromes and life share similar elements at their beginning and end.
His landmark article on the history of palindromes and the SATOR square, appearing in Word Ways in 1979-1980, was sent to me under the name of David R.
Clearly, Type A palindromes for inflected English nouns and verbs are elusive because the base word without the inflectional ending is not a palindrome.
Since Fitzpatrick was one of Bergerson's many alter egos, and Connett published his palindromes under the name Nora Baron for his first couple of years, Montfort's supposition seems well founded.
First of all, there was the 1973 publication of Howard Bergerson's book Palindromes and Anagrams; not only was this the first time many readers had seen explicit references to sexuality in palindromes, but some readers, then and now, have expressed surprise at the relative quantity of the sexual content in the palindromes by Bergerson and J.
I wrote one thousand palindromes before the contest was over.
Greek poet Sotades the Obscene is often asserted to be the originator of palindromes, although there seems to be no clear evidence that he ever wrote anything more in that line than some word-unit reversal sentences.
This was Doug Fink, who has published palindromes on MockOK and who won a palindrome competition with "Lisa Boner ate no basil".
I've detailed how I write palindromes in 'Interview With A Palindromer' on Tim's MockOK site, and reading it now 9 years later, there's nothing I do differently.
Two examples of five-letter symmetrical TNTs are FIONA (FI-O-NA: 6+9=15=14+1) and the palindrome MANAM (MA-N-AN: 13+1=14=1+13), which is an island in Papua New Guinea.