pair bond

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pair bond

n.
The temporary or permanent association formed between two animals during courtship and mating.

pair′-bond′ v.

pair bond

a relationship established between the male and female of higher vertebrates for breeding purposes. In some cases, such as swans, it may last for life.
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Grey herons are noisy but make loving pairs and often perform pair-bonding routines such as "billing" - gently tapping bills together - and raising up their black head plumes to each other.
These dances are a sequel to pair-bonding and usually a life-long monogamous partnership.
The idea that many species of birds pair up for life has been an enduring metaphor for the pair-bonding of humans.
It has something to do with the pair-bonding," says Dickson.
Vectoring, pair-bonding and phantom-mode technologies promise greatly improved rate-reach metrics for copper, as well as faster, cheaper roll-outs.
The results demonstrate that, for owl monkeys, long-term monogamy and pair-bonding improves reproductive fitness.
The results are really intriguing," says Larry Young of Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, who in 2005 reported in Science that, in male voles, a variation of the same gene predicted the quality of pair-bonding.
So the essentialists were right after all, one might conclude on learning that in many species there's evidence of sexual orientation and even same-sex pair-bonding.
Their bizarre pair-bonding exercises see the males beat their chests with their beaks to produce a quick-fire tapping sound.
Washington, May 29 ( ANI ): In early human evolution, when faithful females started choosing good providers as mates, pair-bonding replaced promiscuity, which laid down the foundation for the emergence of the institution of the modern family, a new study has suggested.
And I'd rather see us challenging the hoary assumption that monogamous lifetime pair-bonding is the optimal path to human happiness instead of clamoring for its iron embrace--and by implication denigrating singleness or serial partnering.
These pair-bonding oddities include only about 5 percent of mammals, estimates T.