pain scale

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pain scale

An assessment tool used to measure the intensity of a patient's discomfort.
See: Numerical Rating Scale; visual analog scale
See also: scale

pain scale

an objective value of subjective pain; value (between 0 and 10) is ascribed by the patient to the pain experience, where 0 = no pain at all, and 10 = worst pain experienced/imaginable; used to note pain in relation to daily activities, or document pain changes over a period of time (e.g. a week or month) in relation to a specific therapeutic interventions
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers selected 20 patients ages 17-81 (10 males/10 females) with confirmed joint damage and cartilage injuries, diagnosed with imaging/scoping with low to high pain scales.
Scales: This area provides descriptions and links to commonly used scales, such as numeric pain scales, to help assess patients and improve outcomes.
Paediatric nurses were chosen as reviewers because they are familiar with pain assessment in infants and use a range of pain scales in their clinical work (Ho et al, 1996).
Degree of postoperative pain was evaluated 6 times/d for 4 days by use of 3 methods: an electronic perch for assessment of weight-bearing load differential of the pelvic limbs, 4 numeric rating pain scales for assessment of pain (all of which involved the observer in the same room as the bird), and analysis of video-recorded (observer absent) partial ethograms for bird activity and posture.
Verbal and written instructions regarding the pain scales and pain management at home had been provided prior to the GA.
Following 12 weeks of twice weekly yoga or massage therapy sessions (20 min each) both therapy groups versus the control group had a greater decrease on depression, anxiety and back and leg pain scales and a greater increase on a relationship scale.
Most pain scales require language or cognitive skills but pain scales have been designed specifically for people with advanced dementia, eg the Abbey pain scale and PAINAID.
For example, the pain scales have Chinese faces and characters.
A recent publication shows that over the decades, 28 separate pain scales have been developed and published for assessing lower back pain (Longo, Loppini, Denaro, Mafrulli, & Denaro, 2010).
After the therapy program, there were statistically significant decreases in both the VAS and the WOMAC pain scales in all patients (p<0.
The UGC narrowed their decision down to two potential pain scales: the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) (Figure 3) (Gelinas, Fillion, & Puntillo, 2009) and the Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS) (Gelinas, Fillion, Puntillo, Viens, & Fortier, 2006; Payen et al.
Several pain scales are available, the most simple being the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Verbal Numerical Scale (VNS).