pain scale


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pain scale

An assessment tool used to measure the intensity of a patient's discomfort.
See: Numerical Rating Scale; visual analog scale
See also: scale

pain scale

an objective value of subjective pain; value (between 0 and 10) is ascribed by the patient to the pain experience, where 0 = no pain at all, and 10 = worst pain experienced/imaginable; used to note pain in relation to daily activities, or document pain changes over a period of time (e.g. a week or month) in relation to a specific therapeutic interventions
References in periodicals archive ?
Repeated measure ANOVA was executed with the first 10 observations of N-PASS pain scale as the dependent variable.
3: (a) Pain decreasing trend in numeric rating scale (NRS) during hospitalization days (early post-operative pain) (b) Pain decreasing trend in numeric rating scale (NRS) during follow-up visits (late postoperative pain) (c) pain decreasing trend in visual pain scale (VPS) during hospitalization days (early post-operative pain) (d) Pain decreasing trend in visual pain scale (VPS) during followup visits (late post-operative pain).
Based on the results of statistical tests in table 7 it can be concluded that there is a significant relationship between pain scale data before the pain scale after given analgesics (p=0.
Chiropractic change in pain scale for low back and pelvic pain was similar to the pooled treatment of acupuncture and medications (3.
These P values of the corresponding means for the variables like IPSS score, irritative score, visual analog pain scale and quality of life scale were statistically significant (<0.
In [Figure 1], "II," "III," and "IV" represent the pain scale of second-degree, third-degree, and fourth-degree, respectively.
The pain scores within 24 and 48 hours following surgery, using Neuropathic pain scale (NPS), VRS, VAS were recorded separately.
In Figure 2, see how another iteration of the pain scale has been stratified by number pairs from 11 available selections (0 - 10) down to 7 in an attempt to capture some of the ambiguity in perception and respondent feedback.
This assumption would be supported by the cognitive theory of dual task processing (Kahneman, 1973), which postulated how a phenomenon can occur in two different processes: an implicit (automatic) unconscious process (pain persistence), and an explicit (controlled) conscious process (distraction); (3) the Ignoring Pain scale (IPS) composed of the distraction items of the original AEQ, which are related to the tendency to minimize the meaning of a pain experience despite severe pain.
On pain scale 58% of patients held that their pain intensity lies in range of 5.
On a 100-point pain scale, pain scores averaged about 11 points lower in the surgery group.