analgesic

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analgesic

 [an″al-je´zik]
1. relieving pain.
2. pertaining to analgesia.
3. an agent that relieves pain without causing loss of consciousness.
narcotic analgesic opioid analgesic.
nonsteroidal antiinflammatory analgesic (NSAIA) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug.
opiate analgesic (opioid analgesic) any of a class of compounds that bind with a number of closely related specific receptors (opioid receptors) in the central nervous system to block the perception of pain or affect the emotional response to pain; such compounds include opium and its derivatives, as well as a number of synthetic compounds, and are used for moderate to severe pain. Chronic administration or abuse may lead to dependence.

an·al·ge·sic

(an'ăl-jē'zik),
1. A compound capable of producing analgesia, that is, one that relieves pain by altering the perception of nociceptive stimuli without producing anesthesia or loss of consciousness. Synonym(s): analgetic (1)
2. Characterized by reduced response to painful stimuli. Synonym(s): antalgic

analgesic

/an·al·ge·sic/ (-je´zik)
1. relieving pain.
2. pertaining to analgesia.
3. an agent that relieves pain without causing loss of consciousness.

narcotic analgesic  opioid a.
nonsteroidal antiinflammatory analgesic  (NSAIA) see under drug.
opioid analgesic  any of a class of compounds that bind with the opioid receptors in the central nervous system to block the perception of pain or affect the emotional response to pain, including opium and its derivatives.

analgesic

(ăn′əl-jē′zĭk, -sĭk)
n.
A medication that reduces or eliminates pain.
adj.
Of or causing analgesia.

analgesic

[an′əljē′zik]
1 relieving pain.
2 a drug that relieves pain. The opioid analgesics act on the central nervous system and alter the patient's perception; they are more often used for severe pain. The nonopioid analgesics act primarily at the periphery, do not produce tolerance or dependence, and do not alter the patient's perception; they are used for mild to moderate pain. Compare anodyne. See also pain intervention.

an·al·ge·sic

(an'ăl-jē'zik)
1. A compound capable of producing analgesia, i.e., one that relieves pain by altering perception of nociceptive stimuli without producing anesthesia or loss of consciousness.
2. Characterized by reduced response to painful stimuli.

analgesic

1. Pain-relieving.
2. A pain-relieving drug.

analgesic

a substance that reduces pain without causing unconsciousness.

Analgesic

A medication that relieves pain without causing loss of consciousness. Over-the-counter analgesics include aspirin and NSAIDs.

analgesic

a drug used to relieve pain. See also acetylsalicylic acid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), opiates; Drugs and the law.

analgesic

agents inducing analgesia
  • centrally acting analgesics see opioid analgesics

  • non-opioid analgesics analgesic agents with peripheral action (e.g. paracetamol, aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)

analgesic,

adj 1. pain relieving.
n 2. medication used to manage mild to moderate pain, usually by acting on the central nervous system.

analgesic 

A remedy or agent that relieves pain.

an·al·ge·sic

(an'ăl-jē'zik)
1. A compound capable of producing analgesia, i.e., one that relieves pain by altering the perception of nociceptive stimuli without producing anesthesia or loss of consciousness.
2. Characterized by reduced response to painful stimuli.

analgesic (anəljē´zik),

adj (analgetic), 1. the property of a drug that enables it to raise the pain threshold (e.g., nitrous oxide).
n 2. an analgesic may be classified in one of two groups: an analgesic that blocks the sensory neural pathways of pain (e.g., xylocaine) or an analgesic that acts directly on the thalamus to raise the pain threshold.

analgesic

1. relieving pain.
2. pertaining to analgesia.

analgesic antagonist
used for the control of excessive reaction to or overdosing with the narcotic analgesics. See also nalorphine, naloxone.
analgesic nephropathy
papillary necrosis due to local ischemia resulting from the antiprostaglandin effect of aspirin, phenylbutazone and phenacetin.
References in periodicals archive ?
RISKSOF OTC PAIN RELIEVERS PAIN POTENTIAL RISKS Aspirin Bleeding, hemorrhagic stroke, tin nitus, liver and kidney damage, allergic reaction NSAID (ibupro fen, Bleeding, heart attack and stroke, naproxen) tinnitus, kidney damage Acetaminophen Liver damage, allergic reaction
Major finding: Opioid pain relievers were prescribed by a physician for 18% of people who used them only 1-29 days of the year, but that percentage steadily rose with increasing use, so that 27.
Recipients who received an NSAID or other pain reliever in a given month of the year following implementation of the PAR and switched from a COX-2 inhibitor to an NSAID or other pain reliever in the summer of 2002 were identified.
In 1915, aspirin came onto the over-the-counter drug market, and today there is a huge variety of pain relievers that are spinoffs of aspirin, many offering buffering agents to protect against the still troublesome stomach side effects.
Pain has been in the headlines lately, ever since two of the most common prescription pain relievers, rofecoxib (Vioxx) and valdecoxib (Bextra), were pulled from the market when studies found they could increase the risk of heart attack.
Usually lasts longer than other pain relievers on the market.
OxyContin is only intended for moderate to severe pain that is present on a daily basis and that requires a very strong pain reliever.
4% of the pain reliever market since being made available to consumers in March 1999.
And what about those folks who use over-the-counter pain relievers everyday?
In our society today, we take pain relievers for a number of reasons.
In a typical drugstore, you'll find a multitude of over-the-counter (OTC) products for every sort of pain--as if a different pain reliever were required for everything
Does adding an antihistamine (whose side effect is drowsiness) to a pain reliever really help one sleep?