nociceptor

(redirected from Pain fibers)
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nociceptor

 [no″se-sep´tor]
a receptor for pain, stimulated by various kinds of tissue injury. adj., adj nocicep´tive.

no·ci·cep·tor

(nō'si-sep'tŏr, -tōr),
A peripheral nerve organ or mechanism for the reception and transmission of painful or injurious stimuli.
[noci- + L. capio, to take]

nociceptor

/no·ci·cep·tor/ (-sep´ter) a receptor for pain caused by injury, physical or chemical, to body tissues.nocicep´tive

nociceptor

(nō′sĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A sensory receptor that responds to pain.

nociceptor

[nō′sēsep′tər]
a somatic and visceral free nerve ending of thinly myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. It usually reacts to tissue injury but also may be excited by endogenous chemical substances.
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Nociceptors

nociceptor

Pain receptor Neurology Any of a class of periarticular and mucocutaneous sense organs and neural receptors–eg, reflex loops for reception and response to pain; located primarily in the skin or viscera, nociceptors respond to chemical, mechanical, or other stimuli

no·ci·cep·tor

(nō'si-sep'tŏr)
A peripheral nerve organ or mechanism for the reception and transmission of painful or injurious stimuli.
[noci- + L. capio, to take]

nociceptor

a receptor in the form of a naked dendrite which reacts in response to a pain stimulus.

Nociceptor

A nerve cell that is capable of sensing pain and transmitting a pain signal.

nociceptor

peripheral nerve ending, specific for appreciation and transmission of painful or noxious stimuli

no·ci·cep·tor

(nō'si-sep'tŏr)
Peripheral nerve organ or mechanism for the reception and transmission of painful or injurious stimuli.
[noci- + L. capio, to take]

nociceptor (nō´sisep´tər),

n somatic and visceral free nerve endings of thinly myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. They usually react to tissue injury but also may be excited by endogenous chemical substances.

nociceptor

a receptor that is stimulated by injury; a receptor for pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
Turning off the pain fibers could curb coughing, the researchers surmised.
Fitzgerald (1995) stated that repeated painful stimuli in the neonate results in hyperinnervation, with sprouting of both A and C pain fibers.
It was clear that in some (if not most) patients, pain fibers passing from the geniculate ganglion to the brain did so through the motor trunk of the VIIth nerve, as well as the nervus intermedius.
As discussed previously, once the pain receptors have received a stimulus, they send a pain signal along the afferent (sensory) nerve pathway of pain fibers back to the spinal cord.
Patting at a rate of twice a second seems to inhibit the small pain fibers of the nervous system, providing some relief.
The clinical relevance of the effect on pain fibers in nonclinical studies has not been established.
Evidence has shown that clonidine stimulates an inhibitory receptor in the skin associated with pain fibers.
Because the histamine-sensing itch fibers could not detect itchy mechanical stimuli, like a scratchywool sweater, the researchers turned to another likely culprit: pain fibers.
The descending pain modulation system runs parallel to the pain fibers, involving the cortical and diencephalic systems, mesencephalic systems (periaquaductal gray) to the nucleus rapine magnus which exerts an effect on the dorsal horn.