PSRO


Also found in: Acronyms.

Professional Standards Review Organization

 (PSRO)
an organization established to monitor health care services paid for through Medicare, Medicaid, and Maternal and Child Health programs to assure that services provided are medically necessary, meet professional standards, and are provided in the most economic medically appropriate health care agency or institution.

The PSROs are an outcome of the Social Security Amendment of 1972 (Public Law 92-603), which requires the setting up of PSROs to monitor health care services paid for, wholly or in part, under provisions of the Social Security Act. Each PSRO serves a specific geographic area and develops or selects its own norms of care, diagnosis, and treatment. The norms are based on typical patterns of practice in the area being served, including typical lengths of stay for institutional care by age and diagnosis.

PSRO

Professional Standards Review Organization.

PSRO

PSRO

Abbreviation for Professional Ethics Standards Review Organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the evolving role of these entities, the PSROs were remodeled into the peer review organizations (PROs) (Bhatia et al.
The PSROs were also highly localized in their areas of coverage, with 195 separately designated PSRO areas by 1981 (Mihalski, 1984).
Additional PSRO 2007 speakers include PSRO Director Jeanne Wines-Reed, Kesley Anderson, and Rob Comeau.
and a special advisor and consultant for PSRO, says the joining of the two groups is mutually beneficial.
PSROs were empowered to refuse payments for unacceptable treatment and to exclude doctors from participation in the benefit program.
Using the same mechanism as the EMCROs, the PSROs reviewed records for whether services were medically necessary, met professionally recognized standards and were provided in the most effective and economic manner (Bhatia et al.
Despite the large amount of time, effort, and money spent on PSROs and PROs, they never truly met their stated goals.
Congress thought the function of PSROs was to save money; the members thought it was for quality of care.
With PSROs (now PROs) insisting that the main measure of quality was average length of stay, with hospital payment hanging in the balance, who was going to debate methods theory?
He concludes that the failure of PSROs was due in large part to the lack of effective leverage to change physicians.
Forced upon an unprepared profession in a cultural climate that applauded the discomfiture of all established institutions, medical audit failed to get the professional support it needed, failed in its objectives, and was discarded in 1980 by the PSROs and the JCAH.
In the 1980s, PSROs were replaced by peer review organizations (PROs).