PLISSIT model


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Related to PLISSIT model: dyspareunia

model

 [mod´'l]
1. something that represents or simulates something else; a replica.
2. a reasonable facsimile of the body or any of its parts; used for demonstration and teaching purposes.
3. to initiate another's behavior; see modeling.
4. a hypothesis or theory.
5. in nursing theory, an abstract conceptual framework used to organize knowledge and serve as a guide for observation and interpretation; see also conceptual model.
articulation m's a process of educational mobility in which programs work together to enable students to progress between levels of nursing education programs with the fewest possible barriers and repetitions of content.
conceptual model see conceptual model.
PLISSIT model a progressive design of sexual counseling that contains the four steps of permission, limited information, specific suggestions, and intensive therapy.

PLISSIT model

(plĭ′sĭt)
A guideline used to assess and manage sensitive psychosocial issues, among them issues relating to adult sexuality. The PLISSIT method consists of four steps.1. The practitioner obtains Permission to begin a discussion about sensitive issues.2. Limited Information is provided to the patient.3. As trust is gained and the patient becomes receptive, Specific Suggestions are made.4. Intensive Therapy is offered to those who may require referral to a specialist.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The PLISSIT model provides a framework to help physiotherapists decide what level of involvement they should have regarding interventions for improving a person's sexual wellbeing.
STRENGTHS AND LIMITATIONS: The PLISSIT model and suggested discussion questions are no diagnostic in any manner but rather provide guidance for further work-up or referral.
The purpose of this article is to provide social workers with information about the PLISSIT model (Annon, 1974), the "state-of-the art" intervention used for the treatment of sexuality issues (McCarthy, 2001; Borelli-Kerner & Bernell, 1997), and one that we have used in our professional social work practice with individuals who have chronic health conditions.
The skills necessary to do this are not beyond the reach of the health care team, many possess these skills already, and most are or can become familiar with the PLISSIT model (Annon, 1979).