PLISSIT model


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to PLISSIT model: dyspareunia

model

 [mod´'l]
1. something that represents or simulates something else; a replica.
2. a reasonable facsimile of the body or any of its parts; used for demonstration and teaching purposes.
3. to initiate another's behavior; see modeling.
4. a hypothesis or theory.
5. in nursing theory, an abstract conceptual framework used to organize knowledge and serve as a guide for observation and interpretation; see also conceptual model.
articulation m's a process of educational mobility in which programs work together to enable students to progress between levels of nursing education programs with the fewest possible barriers and repetitions of content.
conceptual model see conceptual model.
PLISSIT model a progressive design of sexual counseling that contains the four steps of permission, limited information, specific suggestions, and intensive therapy.

PLISSIT model

(plĭ′sĭt)
A guideline used to assess and manage sensitive psychosocial issues, among them issues relating to adult sexuality. The PLISSIT method consists of four steps.1. The practitioner obtains Permission to begin a discussion about sensitive issues.2. Limited Information is provided to the patient.3. As trust is gained and the patient becomes receptive, Specific Suggestions are made.4. Intensive Therapy is offered to those who may require referral to a specialist.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The 'intensive therapy' level of the PLISSIT model refers to the type of professional input that is usually only provided by trained relationship counsellors, sex therapists, or physicians.
Taylor and Davis (2006) modified Annon's (1976) work by developing the extended PLISSIT model (or Ex-PLISSIT).
Despite a lack of empirical evidence, the PLISSIT model has been consistently identified in the literature as helping people with disabilities or chronic illnesses who have sexuality issues, even though the model was not developed specifically for this population (Sipski & Alexander, 1997; Westgren & Levi, 1999).