PACES


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PACES

The Clinical Examination from the Federation of the Royal Colleges of Physicians of the UK that was first given in 2001, replacing the MRCP(UK) Clinical and Oral Examinations.
References in classic literature ?
Thus adjured, I started down the passage, and after about twenty paces found myself in a gloomy apartment some forty feet long, by thirty broad, and thirty high, which in some past age evidently had been hollowed, by hand-labour, out of the mountain.
cried the musketeer, "only a man who wants to fly would go at that pace across plowed lands; there is but one Fouquet, a financier, to ride thus in open day upon a white horse; there is no one but the lord of Belle-Isle who would make his escape towards the sea, while there are such thick forests on land, and there is but one D'Artagnan in the world to catch M.
Nay, good brother," said he, "we will ride fast, and thou wilt tire to death at the pace.
A fallen log gave me an instant's advantage, for climbing upon it I leaped to another a few paces farther on, and in this way was able to keep clear of the mush that carpeted the surrounding ground.
He and D'Arnot stepped back a few paces to be out of the line of fire as the men paced slowly apart.
Nearer and nearer came the two birds, all absorbed in their own contest, the stork wheeling upwards, the hawk still fluttering above it, until they were not a hundred paces from the camp.
Vronsky had hardly formed the thought that he could perhaps pass on the outer side, when Frou-Frou shifted her pace and began overtaking him on the other side.
The pace at which they went, was such a very lazy, ill-looking saunter, that Oliver soon began to think his companions were going to deceive the old gentleman, by not going to work at all.
At first, they can only travel at a foot pace, and then with torches going on before, because of the heavy fog.
Slackening his pace for a moment, he leaned over and spoke.
Thus--I am almost ashamed to confess it--but indeed I gave myself no little trouble in my endeavours (if I did keep up with them) to appear perfectly unconscious or regardless of their presence, as if I were wholly absorbed in my own reflections, or the contemplation of surrounding objects; or, if I lingered behind, it was some bird or insect, some tree or flower, that attracted my attention, and having duly examined that, I would pursue my walk alone, at a leisurely pace, until my pupils had bidden adieu to their companions and turned off into the quiet private road.
Daylight stood it magnificently, but the killing pace was beginning to tell on Kama.