asphyxia

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asphyxia

 [as-fik´se-ah]
pathological changes caused by lack of oxygen in respired air, resulting in a deficiency of oxygen in the blood (hypoxia) and an increase in carbon dioxide in the blood and tissues (hypercapnia). Symptoms include irregular and disturbed respirations, or a complete absence of breathing, and pallor or cyanosis. Asphyxia may occur whenever there is an interruption in the normal exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the lungs and the outside air. Some common causes are drowning, electric shock, hanging, suffocation, lodging of a foreign body in the air passages, inhalation of smoke and poisonous gases, and trauma to or disease of the lungs or air passages. Treatment includes immediate remedy of the situation by artificial respiration and removal of the underlying cause whenever possible. See also suffocation. adj., adj asphyx´�ial, asphyx´iant.

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă),
Impaired or absent exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide on a ventilatory basis; combined hypercapnia and hypoxia or anoxia.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]

asphyxia

/as·phyx·ia/ (as-fik´se-ah) pathological changes caused by lack of oxygen in respired air, resulting in hypoxia and hypercapnia.asphyx´ial
fetal asphyxia  asphyxia in utero due to hypoxia.
asphyxia neonato´rum  respiratory failure in the newborn; see also respiratory distress syndrome of newborn, under syndrome.
traumatic asphyxia  that due to sudden or severe compression of the thorax or upper abdomen, or both.

asphyxia

(ăs-fĭk′sē-ə)
n.
A condition in which an extreme decrease in the concentration of oxygen in the body accompanied by an increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide leads to loss of consciousness or death. Asphyxia can be induced by choking, drowning, electric shock, injury, or the inhalation of toxic gases.

asphyxia

[asfik′sē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, a + sphyxis, without pulse
severe hypoxia leading to hypoxemia and hypercapnia, loss of consciousness, and, if not corrected, death. Some of the more common causes of asphyxia are drowning, electrical shock, aspiration of vomitus, lodging of a foreign body in the respiratory tract, inhalation of toxic gas or smoke, and poisoning. Oxygen and artificial ventilation are promptly administered to prevent damage to the brain. The underlying cause is then treated. See also artificial ventilation. asphyxiate, v., asphyxiated, adj.

asphyxia

Physiology
1. Impaired breathing.
2. A pathological state caused by the inadequate intake of O2, with accumulation of CO2 and hypoxia. See Autoerotic asphyxia, Sexual asphyxia.

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă)
Impairment of ventilatory exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide; combined hypercapnia, hypoxia, or anoxia; causes death if not corrected.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]

asphyxia

Suffocation by interference with the free AIRWAY between the atmosphere and the air sacs in the lungs. Asphyxia is usually the cause of death in drowning, choking, strangling, inhalation of a gas which excludes oxygen, foreign body airway obstruction and OEDEMA of the LARYNX.

asphyxia

suffocation, lack of oxygen.

Asphyxia

Lack of oxygen. In the case of cerebral palsy, lack of oxygen to the brain.
Mentioned in: Cerebral Palsy

asphyxia

total deprivation of oxygen from any cause, leading to unconsciousness and death if unrelieved; originally from the Greek, meaning absence of a pulse, which rapidly follows total lack of oxygen. Includes obstruction to breathing (e.g. suffocation, strangulation) or depletion of oxygen in the inspired gas. See also apnoea, hypoxia.

asphyxia (as·fiksˑ·ē·),

n obstruction of air flow resulting in hypoxia severe enough to cause unconsciousness, hypercapnia, hypoxemia, and death, if not immediately treated.

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă)
Impaired or absent exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide on a ventilatory basis; combined hypercapnia and hypoxia or anoxia.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]

asphyxia (asfik´sēə),

n a condition of suffocation resulting from restriction of oxygen intake and interference with the elimination of carbon dioxide.

asphyxia

a condition due to lack of oxygen in inspired air, resulting in actual or impending cessation of apparent life. It includes lack of air to respire. See also suffocation.

neonatal asphyxia
the fetus is deprived of air while on the birth canal and appears to have died during birth. Stimulation of respiratory movements and artificial respiration may cause respiration to resume.
References in periodicals archive ?
She also believes he suffered oxygen deprivation during the birth, leading to cerebral palsy, which was not diagnosed until he was a year old.
These reflections do not intend to either argue for or against the accuracy of descriptions of near-death experiences or to judge whether accounts of people speaking with or receiving visitations from their beloved dead are true or the result of hysteria, hallucination, oxygen deprivation, the release of endorphins, or any of the other explanations raised.
Diffusion Pharmaceuticals is a clinical-stage company developing first-in-class drugs which target the numerous unmet medical needs characterized by oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) at the cellular level.
Retail assistant Maxie of Hinchingbrooke, Cambs, said Isla is severely deaf and added: "We still don't know what 10 minutes of oxygen deprivation will have done.
On Saturday, 17 were discovered huddled inside a Dutch tanker - and needed treatment for oxygen deprivation.
Lawyers acting for the family claim her brain damage was "entirely due" to oxygen deprivation at Caerphilly Birthing Centre.
Rick is a spastic quadriplegic with cerebral palsy as a result of oxygen deprivation at birth.
These comorbidities are due to a combination of severe oxygen deprivation and the toxicity of the patient's own hemoglobin released from their abnormally fragile red blood cells.
The decisive thing was to breed fungal strains in the dark under oxygen deprivation conditions in a nutrient medium supplemented with the vitamin biotin.
Cerebral edema is a common response to a brain injury resulting from oxygen deprivation, according to the medical journals.
Professor Damian Bailey, a University of Glamorgan specialist in brain injury and oxygen deprivation, will supervise key elements of the research.
Minnie screamed at Goran that she'd told his wife they'd slept together, thus awaking him from unconsciousness after extreme oxygen deprivation.