illegitimacy

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Related to Out-of-wedlock: illegitimate child, illegitimacy, bastardy

illegitimacy

Nonmarital, out of wedlock Social medicine The legal status of a child born to unwed parents
References in periodicals archive ?
Whitehead's article is noteworthy because it signaled an emerging consensus on out-of-wedlock births and divorce.
Out-of-Wedlock Births Versus Male Unemployment: A Test Across States (1993) and Out-of-Wedlock Births and Violent Crime.
In August 1998, the society expelled Yahiro Netsu, director of a maternity clinic in Shimosuwa, Nagano Prefecture, after he reported performing an out-of-wedlock in vitro fertilization procedure.
Accordingly, one of the four stated purposes of the new block-grant program, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), is to "prevent and reduce the incidence of out-of-wedlock pregnancies.
Finally, public debate has returned to the issue of reducing out-of-wedlock births as a way of reducing welfare dependency.
Does either "theory" explain the out-of-wedlock birth ratio among African Americans?
He despairs: "For every player with no out-of-wedlock children, there's a guy with three or more.
We focus specifically on the effect that welfare has on out-of-wedlock teen fertility for several reasons.
Furthermore, how much utility individuals receive from having a child out-of-wedlock depends on the level of "social approval" that is associated with having out-of-wedlock children.
Focusing on a sample of young adults age 21-26 in 1988 from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, the authors investigate the determinants of five central outcomes - high school graduation, years of schooling completed, teenage out-of-wedlock birth, receipt of welfare after out-of-wedlock birth, and economic inactivity.
The outcomes examined are high school graduation, completed years of schooling, years of post-secondary education, out-of-wedlock births and subsequent welfare receipt, and economic inactivity.
Its Ike-era prototype, Grace Metalious' Peyton Place, describes the adulteries and out-of-wedlock pregnancies of a small New England town; in Metalious' sequel, Return to Peyton Place, heroine Allison Mackenzie writes a book very like Peyton Place, finds a New York publisher, and enters a swirling cesspool of Manhattan glamour and corruption.