Orthoptera

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Or·thop·ter·a

(ōr-thop'tĕr-ă),
A large order of hemimetabolous insects that includes the locusts, grasshoppers, mantids, walking sticks, and related forms.
[ortho- + G. pteron, a wing]
Orthopteraclick for a larger image
Fig. 238 Orthoptera . General structure.

Orthoptera

an order of the EXOPTERYGOTA, containing grasshoppers, locusts, stick insects and (in some classifications) cockroaches. Most are good runners or jumpers and some have lost the power of flight. Most forms possess biting and chewing mouthparts, and have hardened forewings which are used in creating sounds by movement against the hind leg (STRIDULATION). See Fig. 238 .

Orthoptera

an order of insects of little direct importance to veterinary science except that some act as the intermediate host for some worms. Includes grasshoppers, crickets, cockroaches.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the most overt consequence of direct interaction with orthopterans is the resulting defensive measures the insects take to escape a threatening situation.
In December, odonats dominated; whereas, at the end of the breeding season orthopterans were the most abundant prey.
Major prey species included beetles (26-38%), orthopterans (24-25%), termites (9-12%), lepidopteran larvae (9-11%) and spiders (8-11%).
Dickcissels made ~10% fewer feeding visits, brought proportionately fewer orthopterans (2008), and nestlings received ~14% less biomass when observers were present.
Within the orthopterans, the family Acrididae had a frequency of occurrence of 85.
Orthopterans comprised the second largest volume of food items (23%, 13.
Orthopterans and spiders were the most important components of the diet of C.
Larvae have a relatively low chitin content, while grasshoppers and other orthopterans have a much higher percentage of chitin (Kaspari 1991), and tend to have lower energetic value.
He found that although variation occurred between species, termites formed the largest portion of the diet, with orthopterans, coleopterans, and lepidopterans ranking second, third, and fourth, respectively.
The stomach of one contained a snake; Orthopterans and other insects were found in the other stomach.
Although some insects, such as orthopterans, may increase during dry conditions, the availability and biomass of lepidopteran larvae may decrease, restricting growth rates for young nestlings unable to efficiently process chitonous prey.