orthopraxy


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orthopraxy

 [or´tho-prak″se]
mechanical correction of deformities.

orthopraxy

/or·tho·praxy/ (or´tho-prak-se) mechanical correction of deformities.

orthopraxy, orthopraxis

mechanical correction of deformities.
References in periodicals archive ?
In sum, says Arkoun, the work is "the orthodoxy and orthopraxy in connection with the Qur'an" (p.
After the iconoclasm of 1566, the alterity of the sacred, traditionally associated with the space of the church, invades the world of the profane, according to the Calvinistic program of understanding the orthopraxy of everyday life, in particular of work, as religious practice.
We are both a vertical and horizontal people committed to reconciling sanctification with service, orthodoxy with orthopraxy, the image of God with the habits of Christ, faith with education, righteousness with justice, conviction with compassion and holiness with humility-given the rapid growth of Hispanics in American, it is time to give more attention to this important segment of the American landscape.
As they integrated into broader Syrian society, Alawites (traditionally self-styled as religiously liberal) gradually adopted greater measures of traditional Islamic orthopraxy -- and as intermarriage between Alawites and Sunnis rose (a strong indicator of social integration, and previously unknown in the region), the relations between the two communities were woven with threads of both resentment and solidarity.
However, this theory may also be unhelpful in that the very mechanism meant to keep us from harm also may keep us from each other, affecting both Christian orthodoxy and orthopraxy.
In Agnon's novel which we are considering, the protagonist of a few of the embedded stories, related by characters of the frame story, is a notable who--even though he plots to sabotage a forthcoming wedding, and out of vindictiveness tries to trap the daughter of another character in an unsuitable marriage--is outwardly perceived to be scrupulous in his Jewish orthopraxy.
The familiar, broad issue framing Mason's study is the conflict between religious liberty and social norms, between an idealized pluralism and a rigorously delimited orthopraxy.
Islam constructs an orthopraxy, a set of precepts that each person must follow to be judged favorably at the Day of Judgment; Christianity constructs an orthodoxy grounded in faith, a set of principles that are sometimes used to problematize the precepts that regulate the activities of believers ("It is written, but I say unto you").
Wahhabism (5) began as a small sect in the Arabian peninsular in the 18th century under the leadership of Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab (1703-1792) who deployed the principle of ijtihad ("independent analysis") to call for Islamic revival based on a rigorous monotheism, a strict orthopraxy (correct practice) and a vision of extreme doctrinal purity and social order that he believed characterised Islam in the age of the Prophet.
The papacy and the Roman curia set this reversal in motion with a hastily imposed new canon law and the pope's decision to name bishops universally, each committing himself to total acceptance of the orthodoxy and orthopraxy that Rome would dictate.
The nature of the reconciliation--in this case, an illicit sexual encounter involving a Santa suit--may defy Christian orthopraxy, but the reconciliation itself is linked to matters of orthodoxy.
Orthopraxy (a word borrowed from religious studies) refers to the system under which Chinese, without immediate regard for their subjective beliefs and intent, shape and police their actions to conform to standards held in common by the 'people'.