Oropouche fever


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Oropouche fever

acute febrile illness caused by a species of Bunyavirus.

Oropouche fever

A tropical infection caused by Oropouche virus, genus Orthobunyavirus, a zoonosis similar to dengue fever.

Epidemiology
Transmitted by midges (Culicoides paraensis) and mosquitoes from sloths to humans; occurs in the Amazon, Caribbean and Panama. 30 epidemics of Oropouche fever have been reported, affecting up to one-quarter of a million people.
 
Clinical findings
Chills, headache, anorexia, muscle and joint pain, vomiting and meningismus.

Or·o·pou·che fe·ver

(ōr'ō-pū'shĕ fē'vĕr)
Acute febrile illness caused by a species of Bunyavirus.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Oropouche fever epidemic in northern Brazil: epidemiology and molecular characterization of isolates.
Oropouche virus (OROV) is one of the most common orthobunyaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus) (1) and is the causative agent of Oropouche fever in humans, which is clinically characterized as an acute febrile disease (2).
Further molecular analyses that used OROV strains recovered during outbreaks in Para State during 2003-2007 demonstrated the association of at least 2 different genotypes (I and II) with Oropouche fever cases in the area (9,10).
In contrast to information about the event in Trinidad and Tobago in 1955 that was associated with the first description of the Oropouche fever case, molecular data provided by the small RNA sequences indicated that OROV emerged in South America, more precisely in Para State (strains PA 01-PA 05) in northern Brazil, -89 years ago, and then in Trinidad and Tobago probably through humans carrying the virus during the viremic phase or through illegal shipment of wild animals, as has been suggested for yellow fever virus (18).
Oropouche fever is the second most frequent arboviral disease in Brazil, surpassed only by dengue.
Oropouche fever has reemerged in Parauapebas and Porto de Moz municipalities, Para State, Brazil.
OROV has been isolated in Trinidad, Panama, Peru, and Brazil, and in the past 40 years Oropouche fever has emerged as a public health problem in tropical areas of Central and South America (3).
Criteria for sampling were a history of acute fever several weeks before or during the survey or clinical symptoms similar to those of Oropouche fever.
9% of female patients in Parauapebas and 59% in Porto de Moz had symptoms suggestive of Oropouche fever.
Oropouche virus (OROV) is one of the most important arthropodborne orthobunyaviruses (Bunyaviridae, Orthobunyavirus) (1) that infect humans; it causes an acute febrile illness called Oropouche fever (2).
The first isolation of OROV in the Arinos area in Minas Gerais, Brazil, is of concern because this virus, under favorable ecologic conditions, can spread, and Oropouche fever may develop in the local people, who are susceptible to OROV.
This situation is of particular concern because Oropouche fever epidemics have been reported in several small villages in the Brazilian Amazon region in 2003 and 2004 (Vasconcelos PFC, unpub.