organic food


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organic food

A broadly defined category of food which, in the purest form, is grown without chemical fertilisers or pesticides and sold to the consumer without adding preservatives and synthetic food enhancers; it is widely believed by advocates of alternative healthcare that organically grown foods are safer and more nutritious; however, there are no compelling data that demonstrate clear superiority of organic over non-organic foods. Organic products may be certified by voluntary organisations or government bodies, such as “Farm-Verified organics” and “California Certified Organic Farmer”.

or·gan·ic food

(ōr-gan'ik fūd)
Food grown or raised without the use of additives, coloring, synthetic chemicals (e.g., fertilizers, pesticides, hormones), radiation, or genetic manipulation and meeting criteria of the U.S.D.A. Standard National Organic Program.

organic food

A crop or animal product cultivated with specific guidelines that limit the use of petrochemicals, radiation, or genetically engineered technologies in its agriculture.
See also: food
References in periodicals archive ?
Global Organic Food Market Forecast & Opportunities, 2020" has evaluated the future growth potential of global organic food market, and provides statistics and information on market structure, size, and share.
This is the first year Gallup has asked about eating organic foods in the annual Consumption Habits survey.
The leading seven industrial countries consumes up to 80% of the world's organic food, while containing around 12% of organic food farms.
Organic food producers sell to consumers via a variety of channels.
Sales of organic food rose by 30% last year but until now the health benefits of organic food have been the subject of intense debate, with the Advertising Standards Agency advising against claims of nutritional benefits and the Food Standards Agency cool on those claims.
Mr Ronay accused Mr Miliband of further confusing the situation, saying people are buying organic food in the belief that it is a healthier alternative to conventionally produced food.
NFU president Peter Kendall said he had seen no evidence to prove organic food is healthier.
Organic foods are widely marketed as "healthier" and "better for you" than non-organic foods.
When these shoppers think of organic food, they picture fresh fruits and vegetables combined in lovingly prepared, made-from-scratch meals.
According to the 2004 Whole Foods Market Organic Foods Trend Tracker survey, more than one-quarter of Americans polled (27%) are eating more organic products than just one year ago.
Germany is Europe's largest market for organic food products, with sales likely to top US$4 billion in 2004.