optic nerves


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Related to optic nerves: Cranial nerves, Olfactory nerves

optic nerves

The 2nd of the 12 pairs of CRANIAL NERVES which emerge directly from the brain. The optic nerves are bundles of about one million nerve fibres originating in the RETINAS and connecting these to the brain. Each nerve passes through a channel in the bone at the back of the eye sockets (orbits) to reach the inside of the skull and to join with, and partially cross over, its fellow in the OPTIC CHIASMA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) refers to infarction of any portion of the optic nerve from the chiasm to optic nerve head.
94 Total 101 100 Table 3: Type I Optic Nerves Involvement No.
Additionally, bony dehiscence of the sinus overlying the optic nerve has been found in 4% of cadavers.
October 22, 2013 -- A study performed here found no evidence that stem cell therapy improves vision for children with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH).
The diagnosis of ODD was made on the basis of clinical appearance of the optic nerves, which showed autofluorescence, the advanced visual field defects, and the normal MRI.
The spinal taps showed either top normal or slightly elevated pressures in the spinal fluid surrounding the brain and optic nerves.
Justyna said: "Only stem cells can help her optic nerves grow and give her sight.
Dedicated imaging of the orbits with and without contrast administration (using fat-suppression techniques) revealed faint areas of increased signal on short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences and intense, patchy enhancement of both the optic nerves following contrast administration (Figures 1 and 2).
T2 weighted MRI scanning showed localised intrinsic high signal in both optic nerves posteriorly and partial resolution of frontal and subdural haemorrhages (Figure 2).
Over time, some recurring visual problems may no longer resolve, especially if the optic nerves become damaged.
While experimenting on optic nerves in rats, Larry Benowitz of Children's Hospital in Boston and his colleagues discovered by accident that scratching or poking the lens in an animal's eye could prompt damaged neurons to regrow axons farther toward the brain than researchers had ever seen.