Onychophora

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Onychophora

a small subphylum of primitive arthropods containing the single genus Peripatus. They are worm-like, each segment having clawed limbs, and are probably descended from ancestors of the arthropods which diverged at an early and intermediate stage between annelids and arthropods.
References in periodicals archive ?
Characterisation and localisation of the opsin protein repertoire in the brain and retinas of a spider and an onychophoran.
The first described onychophorans from Costa Rica were collected in the Nineteenth Century around San Jose, capital of the country, by the Alsacian naturalist Paul Biolley.
Following the standard procedure for onychophorans (e.
Onychophorans are almost all carnivores that prey on small invertebrates such as snails, isopods, earth worms, termites, and other small insects (Hamer et al.
To our knowledge, this is the first description of an interaction between onychophorans and theraphosids and also the first biological information for onychophorans in the rainforests of Brazilian Amazon.
To make the onychophoran connection, Ramskold and Hou have stretched the boundaries of the phylum.
Onychophorans are predators that hunt for small invertebrate prey that they capture with an adhesive net mainly composed of water and protein (Bouvier 1905, Read & Hughes 1987, Mora et al.
Biogeographic implications of evolutionary trends in onychophorans and scorpions.
This paper complements Monge-Najera and Hou's (2000) paleoecological study by reporting on experimental decay of these rare animals and presents computer-aided photorealistic reconstructions of extinct onychophorans.
Modern onychophorans are part of terrestrial ecosystems in tropical and south temperate regions (Monge-Najera 1994 a, b), but the Cambrian species were marine and basically tropical (Hou & Bergstrom 1995, Monge-Najera 1995, 1996).
This paper revisits the controversy (with emphasis in onychophorans, which include emblematic organisms such as Hallucigenia), presents new data about the Chengjiang (Cambrian of China) faunal community and compares it and the Burgess Shale (Cambrian of Canada) with on ecologically similar but modern tropical marine site where onychophorans are absent, and with a modern neotropical terrestrial onychophoran community.