ombudsman

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ombudsman

[om′bədzmən]
Etymology: ONorse, umbothsmathr, commission man
a person who investigates and mediates patients' problems and complaints in relation to a hospital's services. Also called patient representative.

ombudsman

As typically used in the UK, a neutral representative of local government who assesses complaints about councils, authorities, organisations, education admissions appeal panels, healthcare professionals (e.g., GPs) and adult social care providers (e.g., care homes and home care providers).

om·buds·man

(ombŭdz-măn)
In health care, a person who acts for the patient as an advocate or go-between.

ombudsman

a public official appointed to look into complaints by members of the public about mistreatment by officers of government instrumentalities.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ohio has been very good to the ombudsman program, recognizing the need for consumers to have an advocate wherever they may live, and has supported us very well to be able to provide that service," she says.
Real People, Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act.
In addition to bringing parties together to help resolve disputes in individual franchise systems, the IFA Ombudsman program serves the entire franchise community by helping identify industry-wide franchise relations trends and common conflicts.
For more information about the ombudsman program, call Montachusett Home Care Corp.
By retaining an outside third party, these employers are fostering the perception of neutrality and objectivity--both important elements for a successful ombudsman program.
Although Ombudsman programs are not allowed to recommend one nursing home over another, they can provide the results of the latest State inspection on the home and some information about the nursing home's complaint history.
Area agencies on aging and the meals and long-term care ombudsman programs were piloted and later written into the OAA to be permanent structures and service programs.
Federal funding for the ombudsman programs in fiscal year 1993 was $24 million; states contributed another $8 million and $6 million came from other local and private sources.
So much is at risk if Medicare, Medicaid, and discretionary programs that serve the elderly are cut-regulation and inspection of nursing homes; the already underfunded long-term care ombudsman program, which advocates on behalf of people who cannot advocate for themselves; home-delivered services for those who want to live in their own homes as they age; transparency in nursing home ownership and quality; protection of elderly husbands and wives from impoverishment when one of them needs Medicaid for long-term care; and much, much more.
SNFs and nursing homes preparing to close would be required to provide written notification to residents, legal representatives or other responsible parties, the state, HHS, and the long-term care ombudsman program at least 60 days before closure.
The Long Term Care Ombudsman Program is in every state and was mandated more than 25 years ago to handle complaints from residents, families, staff and others involved with nursing home facilities.
National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys National Alliance for Caregiving National Association for Home Care National Association of Health Underwriters National Association of Developmental Disabilities Councils National Association of State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs National Center for Assisted Living National Council on Aging National Chronic Care Consortium National Multiple Sclerosis Society New Hope Community, Inc.