ombudsman

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ombudsman

[om′bədzmən]
Etymology: ONorse, umbothsmathr, commission man
a person who investigates and mediates patients' problems and complaints in relation to a hospital's services. Also called patient representative.

ombudsman

As typically used in the UK, a neutral representative of local government who assesses complaints about councils, authorities, organisations, education admissions appeal panels, healthcare professionals (e.g., GPs) and adult social care providers (e.g., care homes and home care providers).

om·buds·man

(ombŭdz-măn)
In health care, a person who acts for the patient as an advocate or go-between.

ombudsman

a public official appointed to look into complaints by members of the public about mistreatment by officers of government instrumentalities.
References in periodicals archive ?
They found a relationship between the rate of complaints to the Ombudsman program and the number of regulatory deficiencies, but no relationship between Ombudsman complaints and staffing.
For a detailed discussion of differences between NC's Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program and the Division of Health Service Regulation, see Troyer and Sanse (2011); a summary of the differences is contained in Table 1.
The IFA Franchise Ombudsman program is an innovative process that can bring people and groups together and produce constructive dialogue.
One of the strategic values of an ombudsman program is to provide an early warning system for the franchisor without any identification of specific individuals.
When the ombudsman program submits its quarterly statistics to management, this case and others like it will alert company leaders that sexual harassment in the workplace is a problem.
Programs housed in conflict-averse hierarchical organizations with diffused client interests, such as Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) (Hyman 1983), may be less resident-centered and more facility-interdependent than private, non-profit ombudsman programs.
Real People Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act.
Federal funding for the ombudsman programs in fiscal year 1993 was $24 million; states contributed another $8 million and $6 million came from other local and private sources.
Ombudsman programs rely heavily on volunteers, with an estimated 882 full-time equivalent paid staff, 6,764 state and local volunteers certified to investigate complaints, and 6,035 non-certified volunteers (per preliminary Administration on Aging data for 1997).
State ombudsman programs have been operating use 1988 regulations written to implement an older version of the Older Americans Act, officials said.
HHS has proposed to have exchanges set up ombudsman programs, or "Navigator" programs, to ensure that low-income people, uninsured people, and other people who may be unfamiliar with health insurance get the kind of assistance that agents and brokers have traditionally provided for people who have health coverage.
While any member of the IFA can access the IFA Ombudsman program, any franchise system can have its own ombudsman program tailored to its specific needs.