type

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type

 [tīp]
the general or prevailing character of any particular case, such as of a disease, person, or substance.
type A a behavior pattern characterized by excessive competitiveness and aggressiveness. See type A behavior.
asthenic type a constitutional type marked by a slender body, long neck, long, flat chest and abdomen, and poor muscular development.
athletic type a constitutional type marked by broad shoulders, deep chest, flat abdomen, thick neck, and good muscular development.
blood type
2. the phenotype of an individual with respect to a blood group system.
body type (constitutional type) a constellation of traits related to body build.
phage type a subgroup of a bacterial species susceptible to a particular bacteriophage and demonstrated by phage typing. Called also lysotype and phagotype.
pyknic type a constitutional type marked by rounded body, large chest, thick shoulders, broad head, and short neck.

type

(tīp),
1. The usual form, or a composite form, that all others of the class resemble more or less closely; a model, denoting especially a disease or a symptom complex giving the stamp or characteristic to a class.
See also: constitution, habitus, personality.
2. In chemistry, a substance in which the arrangement of the atoms in a molecule may be taken as representative of other substances in that class.
3. A specific variation of a structure. Synonym(s): typus [TA], variation (2)
[G. typos, a mark, a model]

type

(tīp) the general or prevailing character of any particular case of disease, person, substance, etc.
blood type  see blood group.
constitutional type  a constellation of traits related to body build.
mating type  in ciliate protozoa, certain bacteria, and certain fungi, the equivalent of a sex.
phage type  an intraspecies type of bacterium demonstrated by phage typing.
wild type  in genetics, the standard phenotype for any experimental organism; also a gene that determines a standard phenotypic trait.

type

(tīp)
n.
1. A number of people or things having in common traits or characteristics that distinguish them as a group or class.
2. A person, thing, or model having the features of a group or class.
3. The type specimen, type species, or type genus, which serves as the basis for the name of a species, genus, or family.
v.
1. To assign to a category.
2. To determine the antigenic characteristics of a blood or tissue sample.

type

the general or prevailing character of any particular case, such as of a disease, person or substance.

type

A simple way of classifying practically anything is to divide it into 2 or more 'types'; in general, typing keeps the number of subgroups to a minimum, while satisfying those with obsessive-compulsive neuroses who are driven to classify diseases, objects, people and mechanisms

type

(tīp)
1. The usual form or a composite that all others of the class resemble more or less closely; a model, denoting especially a disease or a symptom complex giving the stamp or characteristic to a class.
See also: constitution, habitus, personality
2. chemistry A substance in which the arrangement of the atoms in a molecule may be taken as representative of other substances in that class.
Synonym(s): typus.
[G. typos, a mark, a model]

type

(tīp)
Usual form, or a composite form, which all others of the class resemble more or less closely; model, denoting especially a disease or a symptom complex giving the stamp or characteristic to a class.
[G. typos, a mark, a model]

type

1. the general or prevailing character of any particular case of disease, microorganism, person, substance, etc.
2. to determine or assign a character or category.

blood t's
type I to type IV hypersensitivity
type 1 muscle fiber
slow twitch muscle fiber.
type 2 muscle fiber
fast twitch muscle fiber.
wild type
the normal or naturally occurring phenotype of an organism.

Patient discussion about type

Q. how many types of cancer are they?

A. There are over 200 different types of cancer. You can develop cancer in any body organ. There are over 60 different organs in the body where you can get a cancer.

Each organ is made up of several different tissue types. For example, there is usually a surface covering of skin or epithelial tissue. Underneath that there will be some connective tissue, often containing gland cells. Underneath that there is often a layer of muscle tissue and so on. Each type of tissue is made up of specific types of cells. Cancer can develop in just about any type of cell in the body. So there is almost always more than one type of cancer that can develop in any one organ.

Q. What types of arthritis are there? I am familiar with several types of arthritis, for instance R.A or ostheoarthritis. Are there more types?

A. Arthritis is a symptom that can occur on its own as part of a known disease such as RA, osteoarthritis or Gout, and can also happen as a part of other complex of symptoms involving the joints in other diseases such as: Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis and so on. Other diseases can mimic arthritis for instance: osteoporosis or multiple myeloma.

Q. Types of Bipolar I like to know that how many types of bipolar is there and what are its symptoms? Can any one please explain?

A. The DSM-IV (bible of psychological disorders) recognizes two disorders within the category of Bipolar disorders. Bipolar I Disorder is the characteristic cycling of depressive lows and manic highs (the extent and length of these extremes differ from person to person). Bipolar II disorder is cycling between depression and less intense hypomanias. So in a way, Bipolar II is less fun than Bipolar I. Manias and Hypomanias are not just being really happy. They are merely a period of intense energy and activity. The patient often has little control over what they say or do during this period.
There is something in Bipolar disorder called a "Mixed Episode". They are not very common but this is a very distressing period in which a person experiences symptoms from both a mania and a depression at the same time. Dark, disturbing thoughts and intense anxiety and lowered inhibitions--even panic attacks. In the words of my professor: "Mixed episodes suck".

More discussions about type
References in periodicals archive ?
And just as echoes of the oldest stratum of English can be heard in the English spoken today, so, conversely, many words of the Old English Consolatio have a familiarity for us, although their meaning has sometimes strangely altered in the interim.
Considering these patterns of word order variation and their hypothesized significance in Old English, this paper aims to illustrate how insight from linguistic theory can supplement traditional philological insight in the analysis of a well-known Old English proverb.
Verb form contained three conditions: Actual Old English Verb, Regular Verb Form, and Irregular Verb Form.
Bob Sherman, director of gardens and gardening for organic organisation HDRA, said: 'The wassail offers a wonderful opportunity to experience an old English custom.
A new edition is, nonetheless, needed, not only to reflect the current state of scholarship but also to provide a firm text and locus for citations for the Dictionary of Old English, which is in progress at the University of Toronto.
The real problem, Spenser insinuates, lies not in race but in behavior, in the feudal ways of the Old English and their native Irish adherents ("gullible rather than guilty," 85), with both groups "refusing to make way for a new generation of reforming native English" (84).
Although the ideology of masculinity was defined in this era by hierarchy, monarchy, Anglicanism, and mercantilism, a crisis loomed when Puritans began equating sartorial splendor with sin: good old English woolens replaced foreign trifles as acceptable wear.
The earliest of the vernacular versions is an anonymous Old English translation of the legend extant in three eleventh-century English manuscripts.
This year's Show Champion was an excellent large Old English Game female shown by the Aberdare partnership of Davies and Steele, which stood out in the Game Bird section.
Peter Dendle's Satan Unbound: The Devil in Old English Narrative Literature focuses specifically on the Anglo-Saxon period and the ontology of evil as understood by Christian Anglo-Saxons.
In fact, the Old English Game chicken embodies fine production
The Old English, Old High German, and Old Norse roots of this word "reach" mean to stretch oneself repeatedly.

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