Ohm's law

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Related to Ohms Law: Kirchoff's Law

Ohm's law

 [ōmz]
a mathematical relationship formulated by the German physicist Georg Simon Ohm in 1826, comparing voltage (V), current (I), and resistance (R), usable for either alternating current or direct current. It originally applied only to situations of steady direct current, with the formula V = IR; with alternating current, the electrical circuit contains resistors, inductors, and capacitors and the formula becomes V = IZ, where Z is a complex number representing the impedance.

Ohm's law

Etymology: Georg S. Ohm
the principle that the strength or intensity of an unvarying electric current is directly proportional to the electromotive force and inversely proportional to the resistance of the circuit.

Ohm's law

(omz)
[Georg S. Ohm, Ger. physicist, 1789–1854]
The strength of an electric current, expressed in amperes, is equal to the electromotive force, expressed in volts, divided by the resistance, expressed in ohms (V=IR).
See: electricity

Ohm's law

the electric current flowing through a conductor is equal to the voltage divided by the resistance.