beating heart surgery

(redirected from Off-Pump Surgery)
Any cardiovascular procedure, often performed endoscopically, in which the heart is not stopped—e.g., coronary artery bypass grafting on a slowly contracting heart held in place by suction

beating heart surgery

Cardiology Any cardiovascular procedure, often performed endoscopically, in which the heart is not stopped. See CABG.
References in periodicals archive ?
Preliminary results from two completed cardiac surgery randomized controlled pilot studies from University of Hamburg-Eppendorf (N=20) and Medical University of Vienna (N=37), where CytoSorb was used intra-operatively in a heart-lung machine bypass circuit, in low-risk cardiac surgery patients, and interim data from 142 cardiac surgery patients in a 3-arm trial at University of Cologne, comparing inflammatory mediators in patients undergoing off-pump surgery (n=21), on-pump surgery without CytoSorb (n=61), and on-pump surgery with CytoSorb (N=60) demonstrate:
However, despite some evidence for their efficacy, off-pump surgery and multiple arterial grafts have not become widespread (see below).
Notably, mucosal lactate levels were significantly lower during off-pump surgery when compared with on-pump surgery (51).
In the 1990s, surgeons began doing off-pump surgery -- without the machine but with devices that stabilize the beating heart.
We still are betwixt and between with regard to the use of off-pump surgery, as evidenced by the fact that the percentage of cases performed off pump in America appears to have settled out at 20%-25%," added Dr.
Also known as off-pump surgery, this is exactly the same as bypass surgery except it's performed while the heart is still beating.
Pedro Valdes has introduced a new option for Alaska Regional's heart surgery patients, Beating heart surgery, or off-pump surgery, allows the heart to continue beating throughout the procedure, keeping the blood flowing naturally.
It will involve four groups of approximately 100 patients each: those with cerebrovascular risk factors who undergo traditional CABG procedures, those who have off-pump surgery, those with coronary artery disease who do not have bypass procedures, and an age-matched control group with no risk factors and no surgical procedures.
Off-pump surgery has become an attractive alternative to the traditional heart-lung machine, which is used to pump and oxygenate the patient's blood if the heart must be stopped for repairs.
Contrary to the common knowledge that intracoronary shunts are used in off-pump surgery, we used them in an on-pump procedure because excessive collateral blood flow was impeding exposure for anastomoses and further manipulation or coronary clamping were avoided.
6-fold increased risk of death compared with off-pump surgery in this high-risk group.