occult

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occult

 [ŏ-kult´]
obscure or hidden from view.
occult blood test examination by microscope or chemical test of a specimen (such as feces, urine, or gastric juice) for presence of blood that is not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt', ok'ŭlt),
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a concealed hemorrhage, the blood being inapparent or localized to a site where it is not visible.
3. In oncology, a clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
[L. oc-culo, pp. -cultus, to cover, hide]

occult

/oc·cult/ (ŏ-kult´) obscure or hidden from view.

occult

(ə-kŭlt′, ŏk′ŭlt′)
adj.
a. Medicine Detectable only by microscopic examination or chemical analysis, as a minute blood sample.
b. Not accompanied by readily detectable signs or symptoms: occult carcinoma.
v.intr.
To become concealed or extinguished at regular intervals: a lighthouse beacon that occults every 45 seconds.

oc·cult′ly adv.
oc·cult′ness n.

occult

[əkult′]
Etymology: L, occultare, to hide
hidden or difficult to observe directly, such as occult prolapse of the umbilical cord or occult blood.

occult

Medspeak
adjective Not obvious; hidden; of unknown cause.

occult

adjective Not obvious, hidden, of unknown cause noun Paranormal dee-dee-dee–dee–dee-dee-dee–dee

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a disease or condition (bleeding, infection) that is clinically inapparent, though it may be inferred from indirect evidence or identified by special tests.
See: occult blood
3. oncology A clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.

occult

Concealed or hidden, especially of traces of blood in the faeces or sputum which can be detected only by special tests.

Occult

Not visible or easily detected.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
Hidden; concealed; not manifest.

occult

obscure or hidden from view.

occult blood test
examination, microscopically or by a chemical test, of a specimen of feces, urine, gastric juice, etc., to determine the presence of blood not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood in the stools.
occult heartworm infection
infection by Dirofilaria immitis in which circulating microfilariae cannot be detected in the peripheral blood by the usual test methods.
occult spavin
see occult spavin.
occult virus
the virus or infectious agent cannot be isolated but there is strong circumstantial evidence that it is present, e.g. scrapie prion.
References in periodicals archive ?
In North America the current lunar occultation won't look like much.
The team observed the stellar occultation remotely, from MIT's Building 54.
An occultation happens at different times as seen from different places.
An asteroidal occultation of a star this bright or brighter is extremely rare: even more so than a total eclipse of the Sun.
The shadow of the second occultation passed over several large telescopes atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii.
This phenomenon is known as stellar occultation, and a large team of astronomers and researchers are preparing their telescopes and cameras for those days.
This consultation concerns Lot 4 exterior joinery - occultations infructuosit following the initial consultation.
Pawel Maksym was a 29-year-old amateur astronomer from Poland who was very active within the International Occultation Timing Association, European Section (IOTA-ES) and an enthusiastic participant at the annual European Symposium on Occultation Projects (ESOP) conferences, presenting a talk each year and taking part in lively discussions in the lecture theatre, on trips, and in the bar.
Observations of a stellar occultation by Pluto from five sites in Australia were analyzed to constrain Pluto's atmospheric properties.
Haumea isn't the only outer-solar-system body with a ring; occultations by the Centaur objects 10199 Chariklo (S&T: July 2014, p.
Four asteroid occultations were successfully timed from the UK, namely (48) Doris on Sep 14 by Briggs, Haymes, James and Talbot; (83) Beatrix on Nov 25 by Haymes; (1796) Riga on Dec 18 by Haymes and Talbot; and (41) Daphne on Feb 23 by Haymes.
They base this whole idea on observations of stellar light blockages, or occultations, during only two occasions.