occult

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occult

 [ŏ-kult´]
obscure or hidden from view.
occult blood test examination by microscope or chemical test of a specimen (such as feces, urine, or gastric juice) for presence of blood that is not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt', ok'ŭlt),
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a concealed hemorrhage, the blood being inapparent or localized to a site where it is not visible.
3. In oncology, a clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
[L. oc-culo, pp. -cultus, to cover, hide]

occult

/oc·cult/ (ŏ-kult´) obscure or hidden from view.

occult

(ə-kŭlt′, ŏk′ŭlt′)
adj.
a. Medicine Detectable only by microscopic examination or chemical analysis, as a minute blood sample.
b. Not accompanied by readily detectable signs or symptoms: occult carcinoma.
v.intr.
To become concealed or extinguished at regular intervals: a lighthouse beacon that occults every 45 seconds.

oc·cult′ly adv.
oc·cult′ness n.

occult

[əkult′]
Etymology: L, occultare, to hide
hidden or difficult to observe directly, such as occult prolapse of the umbilical cord or occult blood.

occult

Medspeak
adjective Not obvious; hidden; of unknown cause.

occult

adjective Not obvious, hidden, of unknown cause noun Paranormal dee-dee-dee–dee–dee-dee-dee–dee

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a disease or condition (bleeding, infection) that is clinically inapparent, though it may be inferred from indirect evidence or identified by special tests.
See: occult blood
3. oncology A clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.

occult

Concealed or hidden, especially of traces of blood in the faeces or sputum which can be detected only by special tests.

Occult

Not visible or easily detected.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
Hidden; concealed; not manifest.

occult

obscure or hidden from view.

occult blood test
examination, microscopically or by a chemical test, of a specimen of feces, urine, gastric juice, etc., to determine the presence of blood not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood in the stools.
occult heartworm infection
infection by Dirofilaria immitis in which circulating microfilariae cannot be detected in the peripheral blood by the usual test methods.
occult spavin
see occult spavin.
occult virus
the virus or infectious agent cannot be isolated but there is strong circumstantial evidence that it is present, e.g. scrapie prion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The team observed the stellar occultation remotely, from MIT's Building 54.
When a star moves tangentially to the limb of the Moon, and is occulted for a very short period only--a few minutes, or even seconds--a grazing occultation is said to occur.
The shadow of the second occultation passed over several large telescopes atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii.
Comparison of the 2006 data with previous occultation data indicates consistent upper-atmospheric structure since 1988.
The occultation was the first ever to use three radio signals of different frequencies (called Ka, X and S) transmitted simultaneously from a spacecraft to Earth-receiving stations of NASA's Deep Space Network.
I particularly wish to thank Tim for the e-mails highlighting forthcoming occultations visible from the UK, which he has issued on a regular basis.
5038) Overbeek: Named after Michiel Daniel Overbeek (1920 Sep 15--2001 Jul 19), prolific variable star & occultation observer, ASSA President (1961 & 1999) and Gill Medallist (1984).
Pawel Maksym was a 29-year-old amateur astronomer from Poland who was very active within the International Occultation Timing Association, European Section (IOTA-ES) and an enthusiastic participant at the annual European Symposium on Occultation Projects (ESOP) conferences, presenting a talk each year and taking part in lively discussions in the lecture theatre, on trips, and in the bar.
5038) Overbeek: Named for Michiel Daniel Overbeek (1920 Sep 15-2001 Jul 19), prolific variable star & occultation observer, ASSA President (1961 & 1999) and Gill Medalist (1984).
In particular, the lunar occultation method offers a powerful means of identifying binaries among obscured, dust-enshrouded young stars.
Cleaning facades, balconies and recovery railings, installation of occultations,
A full list of occultations and transits can be found in the Handbook of the BAA, and more information is available on the Jupiter Section website at http://www.