objectivism

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objectivism (b·jekˑ·ti·vizˑ·m),

n principle of modern biomedicine according to which the one observing is separate from what is being observed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Subjectivists claim that objectivist theories of well-being are elitist, that they give short shrift to the individual's own point of view on her life, or that they ignore individual differences.
Unfortunately, many objectivists regard non-objectivists as being confused and having cluttered minds rather than having cogent objections to the philosophy.
Eyal Mozes, a research scientist and independent scholar, offers a distinctively Objectivist critique of Sam Harris's defense of determinism in Harris's 2012 book, Free Will.
The Soul of Atlas makes a special call to action so that the Objectivist and the Christian may make an inclusive rather than exclusive choice.
Objectivists don't believe in compromise, because their ideology is seen as the only morally correct view of the world.
See particularly her Virtue of Selfishness or Introduction to Objectivist Epistemology on this topic.
Against this background, we can understand objectivists and perspectivists as disagreeing about the question as to which of the qualified senses of "ought" that are relativized to a certain body of propositions (such as the body of all true propositions, all believed propositions or the propositions that constitute the agent's evidence) provides the correct truth conditions for the practical "ought":
In 1992 Aglialoro gave Leonard Peikoff-Rand's heir and a disciple of her Objectivist philosophy--more than $1 million for the rights to make a movie of Rand's enormous novel, in which the world's most brilliant and accomplished men and women go on strike against a system choking itself to death on statism and altruism.
I don't believe Daniel Hannan is an Objectivist ("Ayn Shrugged," Dec.
Then Athena said; unilateral transfers and the transformation of objectivist ethics.
Rakosi is the last of a quartet of second generation American Modernist poets known as the Objectivists.
Newly clear in this edition is what Niedecker herself called the "surrealist" tendency of her poetry in the 1930s, a tendency at odds with the precepts of the objectivists.