Obersteiner-Redlich zone

O·ber·stei·ner-Red·lich zone

(ō'bĕr-stī-nĕr red'lik),
the narrow line along the course of a nerve (or nerve root) where the Schwann cells and connective tissue that support its axons are replaced by glia cells. The zone marks the true boundary between the central and the peripheral nervous system. Usually located at or near the surface of the spinal cord or brainstem, it can extend (for example, in the eighth cranial nerve) several millimeters out along the nerve.

Obersteiner-Redlich zone

[ō′bərshtī′nər rād′lish, ō′bər- stē′nər red′lik]
Etymology: H. Obersteiner, Austrian neurologist, 1847-1942; Emil Redlich, Austrian neurologist, 1866-1930
a thin line of demarcation between fibers of the peripheral nervous system and the spinal cord or brainstem. It is produced by a basal lamina separating the Schwann cells and collagen of the peripheral nervous system from the neuroglia of the central nervous system.

Obersteiner,

H., Austrian neurologist, 1847-1922.
Obersteiner-Redlich line - Synonym(s): Obersteiner-Redlich zone
Obersteiner-Redlich zone - marks the true boundary between the central and the peripheral nervous system. Synonym(s): Obersteiner-Redlich line

Redlich,

Emil, Austrian neurologist, 1866-1930.
Obersteiner-Redlich line - Synonym(s): Obersteiner-Redlich zone
Obersteiner-Redlich zone - see under Obersteiner