Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

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Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

a federal statute signed in 2010 designed to improve health care access in the United States through insurance reform.
References in periodicals archive ?
But despite these positive developments, both Democrats and Republicans in Washington are considering policies that would not only retain ObamaCare for the indefinite future, but also expand this health-care disaster beyond even President Obamas ambitions.
com/news/health/2017/12/22/obamacare-enrollment-for-2018-stays-strong-in-utah-despite-shortened-enrollment-period/) Salt Lake Tribune , around 195,000 Utahns signed up for health insurance under Obamacare for 2018 6 a figure that mimicked the enrollment number of 2017, despite the fact that the enrollment window assigned for Affordable care Act 2018 was almost half of 2017.
With no remaining legitimate basis for the law, it is time that Americans are finally free from the stranglehold of Obamacare, once and for all.
Trump's promise to repeal ObamaCare comes in the backdrop of an unexpected surge in the enrollment in the health-care law.
Obamacare requires most small business and individual health plans to cover those benefits.
Tax reform should have preceded ObamaCare repeal and replace, because the ultimate patient-centric alternative to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is best triggered through amendments to the tax code, not government control of health insurance markets.
US Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell had announced a vote on a straight repeal of Obamacare, which would take effect in two years, after it became clear on Monday night that he did not have enough support to pass an overhaul of the law.
In the contentious congressional vote of Trump's presidency, lawmakers in the House of Representatives voted 217 to 213 in May to pass the Obamacare repeal-and-replace bill, called the American Health Care Act of 2017.
Four Senators - Ted Cruz (from Texas), Ron Johnson (from Wisconsin), Mike Lee (from Utah) and Rand Paul (from Kentucky) - have announced their opposition to the Senate bill because the bill falls short of Republicans' promises to repeal Obamacare.
This "community rating" mandate is the main reason why premiums in the individual market have roughly doubled under Obamacare in just four years.
Some might criticize Obamacare for covering too few people, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell did in January.
The best thing politically is to let Obamacare explode.