nutrient

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Related to Nutrients: protein, Vitamins

nutrient

 [noo´tre-ent]
1. nourishing; aiding nutrition.
2. a food or biochemical substance used by the body that must be supplied in adequate amounts from foods consumed. There are six classes of nutrients: water, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, minerals, and vitamins.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt),
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]

nutrient

/nu·tri·ent/ (noo´tre-int)
1. nourishing; providing nutrition.
2. a food or other substance that provides energy or building material for the survival and growth of a living organism.

nutrient

(no͞o′trē-ənt, nyo͞o′-)
n.
A source of nourishment, especially a nourishing ingredient in a food.
adj.
Providing nourishment.

nutrient

[no̅o̅′trē·ənt]
Etymology: L, nutriens, food that nourishes
a chemical substance that provides nourishment and affects the nutritive and metabolic processes of the body. Nutrients are essential for growth, reproduction, and maintenance of health.

nutrient

Food industry
A substance added to foods that increases their vitamin, mineral and/or protein content.

nutrient

Food industry A substance added to foods to ↑ vitamin, mineral and protein content Nutrition A general term for proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals, necessary for growth and maintenance of life. See Food additive, Macronutrient, Micronutrient.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]

nutrient

Anything that nourishes. Any physiologically valuable ingredient in food.

nutrient

any material that organisms take in and assimilate for growth and maintenance.

Nutrient

A food substance that provides energy or is necessary for growth and repair. Examples of nutrients are vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

nutrient

a component of food that can be used to provide energy and/or in the synthesis of substances necessary for metabolism, growth and repair, and for all physiological functions (e.g. coenzymes, hormones, haemoglobin). See also macronutrients, micronutrients, minerals, vitamins; appendix 4.1-4.4 .

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
Constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]

nutrient,

n the beneficial chemical in foods and beverages. Classified as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, water, vitamins, and minerals.

nutrient

1. nourishing; aiding nutrition.
2. a nourishing substance, food or component of food. Includes minerals, vitamins, fats, protein, carbohydrate and water.

nutrient allowance
the total feed provided to an animal for a day. Includes its basic nutritional requirements plus allowances for waste in the feeding process, special allowances for special states and activities, and for special qualities of the feed being used.
nutrient analysis
chemical analysis of feedstuff with measurement of fiber, protein, fat, carbohydrate, individual minerals and vitamins.
nutrient artery
one of the arterial blood supplies to a typical long bone; enters the bone via an oblique canal. Other blood supply routes to bone include metaphyseal, epiphyseal and periosteal arteries.
nutrient content
the proportion of a feed or diet that is digestible and assimilable. See also total digestible nutrients.
nutrient profile
a listing of the optimal level of each nutrient in dog and cat foods; published by the Association of American Feed Control Officials.
nutrient requirements
daily requirement for each nutrient for each animal species at the recognized stages of life and production; usually presented in feeding tables.
nutrient veins
mimics the nutrient artery.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 2014 update of the Agricultural Research Service's USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 27, has been launched.
Nutrient recovery offers wastewater treatment plant operators a way to generate income by using recovered nutrients as inputs for the fertilizer industry.
Another group of researchers also finds that plants getting extra carbon dioxide run out of other nutrients.
Spinach is America's most popular dark leafy green, and is very high in calcium and iron, though these nutrients are best absorbed by the human body when the leaves are cooked.
Rich in nutrients, red clover provides support for the entire body.
In the process, the microbes produce methane gas (which the cow releases by belching) and vital nutrients (which the cow absorbs).
She says action priorities should be based on the condition of a particular estuary, with, for instance, an example of a strategy for an estuary in poor condition possibly being to reduce levels of incoming nutrients, while the strategy for a healthier estuary might be to focus on monitoring and prevention of future degradation.
Olestra may cause abdominal cramping and loose stools in some individuals, and inhibits the body's absorption of certain fat-soluble vitamins and nutrients," said FDA Commissioner David Kessler said in a news release announcing the agency's approval.
Fresh fruits and vegetables contain more nutrients than canned or frozen.
They soaked up large quantities of water, moderating flows into the Bay and absorbing large amounts of nutrients.
Seniors may have a deficiency of one or more nutrients and may not know it.