Nuremberg tribunal


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Nuremberg tribunal

Etymology: Nuremberg, Germany; L, tribunus, platform for administration of justice
an international tribunal planned and implemented by the United Nations War Crimes Commission to detect, apprehend, try, and punish people accused of war crimes. In preparation for the prosecution of World War II criminals, the U.S. War Department assigned Andrew Ivy, M.D., to devise a set of principles to govern the participation of human beings in medical research, which became known as the Nuremberg code. The principle and practice of informed consent were reinforced by the precedent set in the trials in which Nazi physicians were declared guilty of crimes against humanity in performing experiments on human beings who were not volunteers and did not consent. See also Helsinki Accords.
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341) The Nuremberg tribunal, and to a lesser extent, the Tokyo tribunal, are generally looked upon as successful instruments of justice and precedents for international criminal law, and it is hoped now that the ICTY and ICTR will achieve similar success.
227) The latterwere in the vast majority in 1945, when the Nuremberg Tribunal wasestablished, and were still overwhelmingly present in 1957, when article 6 of the Covenant was adopted by the Third Committee of the General Assembly.
146) For example, the application of these laws at Nuremberg served to legitimize both German and Allied bombings directed at civilian populations by failing to define such acts as war (147) The Nuremberg Tribunal vested legality on military tactics which had previously been declared illegal by the laws of war.
1) As one prominent international judge has stated, "while the Nuremberg Tribunal was hardly a failure from the perspective of due process rights, its shortcomings inspired its heirs to do better, and the result is a rigorous commitment to due process across the international criminal courts.
See Affirmation of the General Principles of International Law Recognized by the Nuremberg Tribunal, G.
where he had been sworn in as the American member of the International Military Tribunal for the Trial of German Major War Criminals, the Nuremberg Tribunal.
At some point, the prosecution has to start treating this like the Nuremberg tribunal -- as an opportunity to re-educate the world about what the terrorists did and why they are on trial.
Not least, he is the proud son of Hartley Shawcross, Britain's lead prosecutor at the Nuremberg Tribunal, in which the victorious Allies tried many of the worst Nazis for war crimes.
This right is based not only in Article 3 of the 1949 Geneva Convention but also in the guiding lines set for by the International Tribunal in Nuremberg The statutory argument in article 2 of the indictments (concerning transgressions against the laws on conducts of war) at the Nuremberg Tribunal was based upon the Hague International Convention of 1907, writes the Israeli author Hans Lebrecht which Qumsiyeh quotes.
The judgment of the Nuremberg Tribunal (1945-46) and the remarks of the trial judges are considered the primary source for international law.
Both questions reveal how much we still live in the shadow of the Nuremberg Tribunal, where the Nazi leaders were tried by an international judicial panel.
The Bulgarian rulers do not have the right to question Bulgaria's principled affiliation with the European and global anti-fascist family and to deny indirectly the Nuremberg Tribunal," says the Bulgarian Left.