Nuremberg Code


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An international code of research ethics developed during the trials of Nazi war criminals after World War II and widely adopted as a standard during the 1950s and 1960s for protecting human subjects involved in clinical trials and research

Nuremberg Code

(nŭr′ĕm-bĕrg)
A set of principles established after World War II to protect the rights of research participants (subjects).

Nuremberg,

city in Germany in which code was established following World War II.
Nuremberg Code - protects the rights of individuals who participate in medical research.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Nuremberg Code, the Declaration of Helsinki, and the CIOMS Guidelines are professional codes that have been adopted by international professional organizations.
The Nuremberg Code insists that consent be "voluntary, competent, informed and understanding.
T]he Nuremberg Code was conceived in reference to Nazi atrocities and was written for the specific purpose of preventing brutal excesses from being committed or excused in the name of science.
International Mandates to Protect Children as Research Participants Year Mandate Pediatric Features 1947 Nuremberg Code "Voluntary consent of the human subject is absolutely essential" (Nuremberg Code, 1949), excluding all children from research participation.
55) The families brought suit pursuant to the Alien Tort Claims Act and sought to recover damages for violations of international law established under: the Declaration of Helsinki, the Nuremberg Code, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), and other international customary norms.
The importance of the Nuremberg Code (Code) as a point of departure for the bioethics and broader human rights movements can hardly be overstated.
President Bush signed the bill, which required the agency to adopt regulations that incorporated the NAS guidelines and the international Nuremberg Code and that banned using children and pregnant women as subjects.
The Nuremberg Trials (1946-1949), held by an American military tribunal as a consequence of crimes committed against prisoners of war by Nazi physicians during World War II, resulted in the establishment of the Nuremberg Code (Trials of War Criminals Before the Nuremberg Military Tribunals Under Control Council Law No.
In an attempt to deal with the atrocities of World War II, the post-war Nuremberg Code, and indeed all subsequent codes, were explicit on the need for voluntary consent in experiments that entail risks to humans.