nuclease

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nuclease

 [noo´kle-ās]
any of a group of enzymes that split nucleic acids into nucleotides and other products.

nu·cle·ase

(nū'klē-ās),
General term for enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nucleic acid into nucleotides or oligonucleotides by cleaving phosphodiester linkages. For nucleases not listed here, see the specific term. Compare: exonuclease, endonuclease.

nuclease

/nu·cle·ase/ (noo´kle-ās) any of a group of enzymes that split nucleic acids into nucleotides and other products.

nuclease

(no͞o′klē-ās′, -āz′, nyo͞o′-)
n.
Any of several enzymes, including the endonucleases and the exonucleases, that hydrolyze bonds between nucleotides in nucleic acids.

nuclease

An enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond of polynucleotide chains and phosphate-deoxyribose bonds within (endonuclease) or at the end (exonuclease) of a nucleotide sequence (nucleic acid). Nucleases are produced by most biologic systems and usually recognise a specific substrate, such as single- or double-stranded DNA or RNA.

nu·cle·ase

(nū'klē-ās)
General term for enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nucleic acid into nucleotides or oligonucleotides.
Compare: exonuclease, endonuclease

nuclease

Any one of several enzymes that break down NUCLEIC ACIDS.

nuclease

any enzyme that promotes hydrolysis of NUCLEIC ACIDS. For example, DNase, which catalyses the breakdown of DNA into individual DNA NUCLEOTIDES. The enzyme cleaves PHOSPHODIESTER BONDS of the nucleic acid. See ENDONUCLEASE, EXONUCLEASE.

nuclease

any of a group of enzymes that cleave or digest nucleic acids into fragments or single nucleotides.

S1 nuclease
a single-strand-specific endonuclease that degrades DNA and RNA to nucleoside 5′-monophosphates. The enzyme is a single polypeptide chain of molecular weight 32,000 and is isolated from 'takadiesterase', a digestive enzyme preparation from Aspergillus oryzae. Widely used in molecular biology to map the position of mRNA to its DNA, and also used to remove single-stranded tails from DNA fragments, to produce blunt ends to open up hairpin-loop structures.