novel

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novel

Intellectual property
adjective Referring to that which is new and/or original—i.e., the invention must never have been made in public in any way, anywhere, before the date on which the application for a patent is filed.

Vox populi
noun Fictional prose of book length, the storyline of which has some degree of realism.
References in periodicals archive ?
He also talks to novelist, scholar, and activist Basma Abdel Aziz, who writes about power and authority.
It is odd, for example, that the section on Latino novelists leaves out Oscar Hijuelos and Julia Alvarez.
All" novelists do not inhabit their own fictionalized worlds.
The USA was one of the few countries that translated six per cent of Arab books, but Waciny hoped to see the works of American novelists Bill Loehfelm and Mark Z.
A novelist is someone who writes books about fiction; a critic is someone who writes fiction about books.
html) pointed out in the New York Times on Wednesday that editors of the crowd-sourced encyclopedia have begun removing the names of American female novelists from the "American novelists" category and placing them into their own subcategory: "American female novelists.
As Southgate says, novelists have been better at raising awareness of the problematic nature of history, but that is because we like reading novels not synopses of their ideas.
Novelists realise that writing about the past allows them to explore the present imaginatively and undertake sophisticated investigation of a multitude of issues, themes, places and characters.
From its inception as a sacred volume of authorized scriptures, the Bible has continued down through the years a rich source of literary inspiration for everything from Dante's "Inferno", to John Bunyon's "Pilgrim's Progress", to the contemporary novelists writing today.
T]he majority of eighteenth-century novels were actually written by women, but this had long remained a purely quantitative assertion of dominance," Ian Watts's unsubstantiated "throw-away line" in The Rise of the Novel (1957), motivated Dale Spender's hypothesis that early women novelists were deliberately excluded from literary canons based only on their sex.
ASPIRING North East novelists have been given the chance to win a publishing contract and work alongside best-selling local authors.
Callow came from a group of novelists which included Alan Sillitoe and David Storey who specialised in gritty working class writing of the post-war years.