maternal deprivation syndrome

(redirected from Non-Organic Failure to Survive)

maternal

 [mah-ter´nal]
pertaining to the female parent.
maternal deprivation syndrome failure to thrive with severe growth retardation, unresponsiveness to the environment, depression, retarded mental and emotional development, and behavioral problems as a result of loss, absence, or neglect of the mother or other primary caregiver.

ma·ter·nal dep·ri·va·tion syn·drome

a failure to thrive seen in infants and young children and exhibited as a constellation of physical signs, symptoms, and behaviors, usually associated with maternal loss, absence or neglect, and characterized by lack of responsiveness to the environment and often depression.

maternal deprivation syndrome

Etymology: L, maternus, motherhood, deprivare, to deprive; Gk, syn, together, dromos, course
a condition characterized by developmental retardation that occurs as a result of physical or emotional deprivation. It is seen primarily in infants. Typical symptoms include lack of physical growth, with weight below the third percentile for age and size; malnutrition; pronounced withdrawal; silence; apathy; irritability; and a characteristic posture and body language, featuring unnatural stiffness and rigidity with a slow response reaction to others. Causes of the syndrome are usually multiple and complex, involving such factors as parental indifference; emotional instability or insecurity of the mother; lack of or delayed development of the mother-child attachment process; unrealistic expectations or disappointment concerning the sex, appearance, or adaptability of the child; or unfavorable socioeconomic conditions within the family. Treatment often requires hospitalization, especially in cases of severe malnutrition. Care includes assessment of the family situation, and treatment often involves psychotherapy, counseling, or special nursing instruction to help the parents learn to deal with and provide for the child. The nature and extent of the effects of the condition on later physical, emotional, intellectual, and social development vary considerably and depend on the age at which deprivation occurs, the degree and duration of the situation, the child's constitutional makeup, and the substituted care that is provided. Emotionally deprived children often remain below normal in intellectual development, fail to learn acceptable social behavior, and are unable to form trusting, meaningful relationships with others. In severe cases of early and prolonged deprivation, the damage to an infant may be irreversible. See also failure to thrive.
A form of failure to thrive affecting infants and toddlers, caused by dysfunctional caregiver interaction, poverty, child abuse, and parental ignorance about appropriate child care
Factors Absent father or support group—family, friends, etc.; low maternal education or socioeconomic status, mental illness, teen or unwanted pregnancy

maternal deprivation syndrome

Non-organic failure to survive Neonatology A condition affecting socioeconomically disadvantaged infants and toddlers Factors Absent father or support group–family, friends, etc; low maternal education or socioeconomic status, mental illness, teen or unwanted pregnancy. See Failure to thrive.

ma·ter·nal dep·ri·va·tion syn·drome

(mă-tĕrnăl dep-ri-vāshŭn sindrōm)
Failure to thrive seen in infants and young children exhibited as a constellation of physical signs, symptoms, and behaviors, usually associated with maternal loss, absence or neglect, and characterized by lack of responsiveness to the environment and often depression.
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