neutrophilia

(redirected from Neutrophil leucocytosis)
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Related to Neutrophil leucocytosis: neutrophilia, leukocytosis

leukocytosis

 [loo″ko-si-to´sis]
a transient increase in the number of leukocytes in the blood, due to various causes.
basophilic leukocytosis basophilia (def. 1).
eosinophilic leukocytosis eosinophilia (def. 1).
mononuclear leukocytosis mononucleosis.
neutrophilic leukocytosis neutrophilia.
pathologic leukocytosis that due to some morbid condition, such as infection or trauma.
physiologic leukocytosis that caused by nonpathologic factors such as strenuous exercise.

neu·tro·phil·i·a

(nū'trō-fil'ē-ă),
An increase of neutrophilic leukocytes in blood or tissues; also frequently used synonymously with leukocytosis, inasmuch as the latter is generally the result of an increased number of neutrophilic granulocytes in the circulating blood (or in the tissues, or both). N. is usually absolute, that is, there is an increase in the total number of leukocytes as well as an increased percentage of neutrophils; in some instances, neutrophilia may be relative (that is, there is an increased percentage of neutrophils), but the total number of all types of leukocytes may be within the normal range.

neutrophilia

/neu·tro·phil·ia/ (noo″tro-fil´e-ah) increase in the number of neutrophils in the blood.

neutrophilia

[-fil′yə]
an elevated number of neutrophils in the blood, a common cause of leukocytosis.

neutrophilia

Granulocytic leukocytosis Hematology An absolute neutrophil count of > 8,000/mm3, which may be physiologic or pathologic. See Hereditary neutrophilia, Physiologic neutrophilia. Cf Neutropenia.

neu·tro·phil·i·a

(nū'trō-fil'ē-ă)
An increase of neutrophils in blood or tissues.

neutrophilia

An increased number of NEUTROPHIL white cells (leucocytes) in the blood. This is often an indication of an infection somewhere in the body.

neu·tro·phil·i·a

(nū'trō-fil'ē-ă)
An increase of neutrophils in blood or tissues.

neutrophilia (noo´trōfil´ēə),

n an absolute or relative increase in the normal number of neutrophils in the circulating blood. Various limits are given; e.g., an absolute neutrophilia may exist, regardless of percentage, if the total number of neutrophils exceeds 7000/mm3, whereas a relative neutrophilia may exist if the percentage of neutrophils is greater than 70% and the total number of neutrophils is less than 7000/mm3. May be associated with acute infections, chronic granulocytic leukemia, erythemia, therapy with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or cortisone, uremia, ketosis, hemolysis, drug or heavy metal intoxication, or malignancy, or it may follow severe hemorrhage.

neutrophilia

an increase in the number of neutrophils in the blood.

inflammatory neutrophilia
see true neutrophilia (below).
physiological neutrophilia
see pseudo-neutrophilia (below).
pseudo-neutrophilia
one caused by a shift of neutrophils from the marginal pool to the circulating pool; there is no real increase in the total number of neutrophils. It is seen with stress and exercise.
stress neutrophilia
see pseudo-neutrophilia (above).
true neutrophilia
one in which there is an increase in the total blood granulocyte pool. It is seen in chronic infection.
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