neutron

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Related to Neutrons: Thermal neutrons, Protons

neutron

 [noo´tron]
an electrically neutral or uncharged particle of matter existing along with protons in the atoms of all elements except the mass 1 isotope of hydrogen.

neu·tron (n),

(nū'tron),
An electrically neutral particle in the nuclei of all atoms (except hydrogen-1) with a mass slightly greater than that of a proton; in isolation, has a half-life of about 10.3 minutes.
[L. neuter, neither]

neutron

/neu·tron/ (noo´tron) an electrically neutral or uncharged particle of matter existing along with protons in the nucleus of atoms of all elements except the mass 1 isotope of hydrogen. Symbol n.

neutron

[n(y)o̅o̅′tron]
Etymology: L, neuter, neither; Gk, elektron, amber
(in physics) an elementary particle that is a constituent of the nuclei of all elements except the isotopic form of hydrogen 1H. It has no electric charge and has approximately the same mass as a proton. Compare electron, proton. See also atom.

neutron

As defined in magnetic resonance, a neutron is an uncharged neutral particle located in the nucleus of an atom which serves as a stabiliser.

neu·tron

(nū'tron)
An electrically neutral particle in the nuclei of all atoms (except hydrogen-1) with a mass slightly larger than that of a proton; in isolation, it breaks down to a proton and an electron with a half-life of about 10.3 minutes.
[L. neuter, neither]

neutron (nōōˑ·trn),

n the neutral subatomic particle located within the nucleus of an atom. Its mass is equivalent to that of a proton.

neu·tron

(nū'tron)
An electrically neutral particle in the nuclei of all atoms (except hydrogen-1) with a mass slightly larger than that of a proton; in isolation, it breaks down to a proton and an electron with a half-life of about 10.3 minutes.
[L. neuter, neither]

neutron (noo´tron),

n an elementary particle with approximately the mass of a hydrogen atom but without any electrical charge; one of the constituents of the atomic nucleus.
neutron activation analysis,
n an activation analysis in which the specimen is bombarded with neutrons. Identification is made by measuring the resulting radioisotopes.
neutron ray,

neutron

an electrically neutral or uncharged particle of matter existing along with protons in the atoms of all elements except the mass 1 isotope of hydrogen.
References in periodicals archive ?
That need for neutrons leads to a competing idea: that heavy elements form when two neutron stars collide and some of their crustal material escapes into space.
To evaluate this possibility, theorists need to improve the models of neutron star composition.
The scientists used an effect of Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity to measure the mass of the neutron star and its orbiting companion, a white dwarf star.
When a neutron probe is lowered through an access tube into the ground, the fast neutrons emitted by the source collide with the atomic nuclei of the surrounding medium (refer Fig.
A neutron beam capability is an essential element of a nation's scientific infrastructure because of the unique way in which neutrons interact with matter.
This agreement with an established world leader like Varian will make our neutron generation technology available to the market more rapidly," said Dr.
The neutrons move in the vacuum of the warm bore of the superconducting quadrupole magnet.
On the main stage, a fissioning uranium atom releases two to three neutrons.
Neutrons with energies higher than the trap depth can escape from the trap.
If an atom's total number of neutrons, protons, and electrons is even, as is the case for the most common isotope of helium, then the atom is a boson; if the sum is odd, as is the case with the lithium atoms that the Duke researchers used, then the atom is a fermion.
The effects of high-energy neutrons on advanced static RAM-based integrated circuits in the atmospheric radiation environment is of concern to designers of avionics and other equipment operating at aircraft altitudes.
Key words: angular-correlation coefficients; neutron [beta]-decay.