neurobiology

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neurobiology

 [noor″o-bi-ol´o-je]
biology of the nervous system.

neu·ro·bi·ol·o·gy

(nū'rō-bī-ol'ŏjē),
The biology of the nervous system.

neurobiology

/neu·ro·bi·ol·o·gy/ (-bi-ol´ah-je) biology of the nervous system.

neurobiology

(no͝or′ō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē, nyo͝or′-)
n.
The biological study of the nervous system.

neu′ro·bi′o·log′i·cal (-bī′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
neu′ro·bi·ol′o·gist n.

neurobiology

[-bī′ol′əjē]
a branch of biology that is concerned with the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system.

neurobiology

The formal study of the physiology and physiopathology of the nervous system.

neurobiology

biology of the nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, the techniques used by neurobiologists have been amplified by our increasing ability to study the biological bases of behaviour.
Cell and structural biologists, geneticists, neurobiologists, and immunologists delve into such issues as the organizing principles behind cell shape change, whether there are master switches in every cell type, how extracellular signals are interpreted by the cell in order to activate intracellular mechanisms, the influence of the extra-cellular matrix on cell movements and internal signaling pathways, and how pathogens subvert cellular systems in order to stimulate or block their uptake.
Neurobiologists have long surmised that itch units are a type of nerve fiber especially sensitive to histamines, says pain researcher H.
Rosbash and Takahashi are both leading neurobiologists with unparalleled expertise in circadian rhythms, sleep-wake disorders, in vivo assays and functional genomics.
We based the model on the best and most recent biological findings developed by neurobiologists on the various phases of the cycle and built our mathematical equations from that foundation.
Freeman's perspective clashes with materialist theories, which conceive of the mind as a by-product of biological happenings in the brain--the interplay of billions of neurons for most neurobiologists, a cerebral stew of chemical and hormonal interactions for geneticists and pharmacologists, and the commingling of quantum forces for physicists.
Mending the shattered spine and flooding deadened limbs with life, a feat considered unthinkable just a decade ago, represents climbing Mount Everest for many neurobiologists.
For at least a century, neurobiologists have suspected that developing nerve cells are somehow told what connections to make.
Twenty years later, neurobiologists began pondering a strange movement disorder that affected a tribe indigenous to New Guinea.
Just as the increasing sophistication of microscopy techniques have enabled neurobiologists to view nerve cells as they never could before, tools borrowed from mathematicians and physicists are now providing new insights into the electrical activity of these cells.
By transplanting brain tissue from specially bred rats into normal rats, neurobiologists have homed in on a brain region that can cause hypertension.
For years, neurobiologists have debated the role of a peptide called beta-amyloid in the development of Alzheimer's disease (SN: 1/1/94, p.