Trichoptera

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Tri·chop·ter·a

(tri-kop'tĕr-ă),
An order of insects in which the aquatic larvae (caddis flies) construct a protective case (caddis) of bits of submerged material in a highly specific form; commonly found attached under stones in freshwater streams. The adult caddis flies, having hairy wings, shed their hairs and epithelia, causing hay fever-like (allergic) symptoms in sensitive people.
[tricho- + G. pteron, wing]

Trichoptera

the insect order containing the caddis flies. The larvae are aquatic and often live in a case or tube which they carry around; they include herbivores and carnivores and some species act as indicators of pollution. The adults have reduced mouthparts and feed only rarely.