neovascularization

(redirected from Neovascularization, physiologic)
Also found in: Dictionary.

neovascularization

 [ne″o-vas″ku-lar-ĭ-za´shun]
1. new blood vessel formation in abnormal tissue or in abnormal positions; see also angiogenesis.

ne·o·vas·cu·lar·i·za·tion

(nē'ō-vas'kyū-lar-i-zā'shŭn),
Proliferation of blood vessels in tissue not normally containing them, or proliferation of blood vessels of a different kind than usual in tissue.

neovascularization

The formation of new blood vessels–ie, capillary ingrowth and endothelial proliferation in unusual sites, a finding typical of so-called 'angiogenic diseases,' which include angiogenesis in tumor growth, diabetic retinopathy, hemangiomas, arthritis, psoriasis

ne·o·vas·cu·lar·i·za·tion

(nē'ō-vas'kyū-lar-ī-zā'shŭn)
Proliferation of blood vessels in tissue not normally containing them, or proliferation of blood vessels of a different kind than usual in tissue.

Neovascularization

Abnormal or excessive formation of blood vessels as in some retinal disorders.

vascularization

; neovascularization new blood vessel formation

neovascularization

Development of new blood vessels, especially in tissues where circulation has been impaired by disease or trauma.
choroidal neovascularization (CNV) Abnormal growth of blood vessels, originating in the choriocapillaris, which pass through Bruch's membrane and then proliferate under the retinal pigment epithelium (type 1) and/or under the retina (type 2). It may occur as a result of a rupture of Bruch's membrane, release of cytokines (e.g. VEGF), inflammation, oxidative stress to the retinal pigment epithelium, or vascular insufficiency. The condition is the main cause of exudative (wet) age-related macular degeneration and it may be associated with various disorders including angioid streaks, choroidal rupture, pathological myopia, chorioretinal scars and birdshot retinochoroidopathy. See age-related macular degeneration.
corneal neovascularization See pannus.
iris neovascularization Abnormal formation of new blood vessels on the anterior surface of the iris. It is commonly associated with many conditions that have led to retinal ischaemia, such as diabetic retinopathy, occlusion of the central retinal vein, carotid arterial disease, uveal melanoma, long-standing retinal detachment, etc. The neovascularization begins at the pupil margin and often at the same time in the angle of the anterior chamber and spreads over the whole surface. New vessels are associated with fibrous tissue membranes, which may block the passage of aqueous humour through the trabecular meshwork (neovascular glaucoma) and ectropion uveae near the pupillary margin. Treatment typically includes photocoagulation to prevent the formation of new blood vessels.

neovascularization

formation of new blood vessels.