neoplasm

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neoplasm

 [ne´o-plazm]
tumor; any new and abnormal growth, specifically one in which cell multiplication is uncontrolled and progressive. Neoplasms may be benign or malignant.

ne·o·plasm

(nē'ō-plazm),
An abnormal tissue that grows by cellular proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. Neoplasms show partial or complete lack of structural organization and functional coordination with the normal tissue, and usually form a distinct mass of tissue that may be either benign (benign tumor) or malignant (cancer).
Synonym(s): new growth, tumor (2)
[neo- + G. plasma, thing formed]

neoplasm

/neo·plasm/ (ne´o-plazm) tumor; any new and abnormal growth, specifically one in which cell multiplication is uncontrolled and progressive. Neoplasms may be benign or malignant.

neoplasm

(nē′ə-plăz′əm)
n.
An abnormal new growth of tissue in animals or plants; a tumor.

ne′o·plas′tic (-plăs′tĭk) adj.

neoplasm

[nē′ōplaz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, neos + plasma, formation
any abnormal growth of new tissue, benign or malignant. Also called tumor. See also benign, cancer, malignant. neoplastic, adj.

neoplasm

(1) An abnormal mass of tissue, the growth of which exceeds and is uncoordinated with that of normal tissue, and persists in the same excessive manner after cessation of the stimuli evoking the change.
(2) Any autonomous proliferation of cells, benign or malignant.

Neoplasm classifications
• Behavior—Benign, borderline or malignant. 
• Degree of differentiation—Well differentiated (i.e., the neoplastic cell simulates its parent or progenitor cell) or poorly differentiated (i.e., the neoplastic cell is bizarre and “ugly”, as defined by pathologic criteria).
• Embryologic origin—Epithelial (e.g., adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma), lymphoproliferative (e.g., leukaemia, lymphoma), mesenchymal (e.g., sarcoma). 
• Gross appearance—Well circumscribed or infiltrative: benign neoplasms are usually slow growing, well circumscribed, often with a fibrous capsule, and are symptomatic only if they compromise a confined space (e.g., massive meningioma of the cranial cavity, or encirclement of vital blood vessels); malignancies are often aggressive with increased mitotic activity, bizarre cells, necrosis and invasion of adjacent structures, and have metastatic potential.

neoplasm

Oncology 'An abnormal mass of tissue, the growth of which exceeds and is uncoordinated with that of normal tissue and persists in the same excessive manner after cessation of the stimuli evoking the change'; an autonomous proliferation of cells, benign or malignant. See Cancer, Doubling time, Intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm of pancreas, Metastases, Papillary & solid neoplasm of pancreas.
Neoplasm classifications
Behavior Benign, borderline or malignant
Degree of differentiation Well-differentiated, ie the neoplastic cell simulates its parent or progenitor cell or poorly-differentiated, ie the neoplastic cell is bizarre and ''ugly', as defined by pathologic criteria'
Embryologic origin Epithelial–eg adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, lymphoproliferative–eg leukemia, lymphoma, mesenchymal–eg sarcoma, histiocytosis, neural crest–eg carcinoid tumor, some small cell carcinomas, etc
Gross appearance Well-circumscribed or infiltrative; benign neoplasms, usually slow-growing, well-circumscribed, often with a fibrous capsule, and are symptomatic only if they compromise a confined space, eg massive meningioma of the cranial cavity, or encirclement of vital blood vessels; malignancies are often aggressive with ↑ mitotic activity, bizarre cells, necrosis and invasion of adjacent structures and have metastatic potential

ne·o·plasm

(nē'ō-plazm)
An abnormal tissue that grows by cellular proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. Neoplasms show partial or complete lack of structural organization and functional coordination with the normal tissue, and usually form a distinct mass of tissue which may be either benign (benign tumor) or malignant (cancer).
Synonym(s): tumor (2) .
[G. neo- new + G. plasma, thing formed]

neoplasm

A collection of cells, derived from a common origin, often a single cell, that is increasing in number and expanding or spreading, either locally or to remote sites. A tumour. Neoplasms may be BENIGN or MALIGNANT. The term literally means a new growth. See also CANCER.

neoplasm

an autonomous growth of tissue in the body which has no apparent physiological function, such as a TUMOUR.

Neoplasm

An abnormal formation of tissue; for example, a tumor.

neoplasm

benign or malignant lesion formed as a distinct mass of neoplastic tissue; characterized by partial/total lack of normal structural organization/functional coordination with normal tissues at that site; Table 1
Table 1: Examples of cutaneous neoplastic lesions of the elderly
Lesion typeExamplesComment
BenignSeborrhoeic warts (basal cell papilloma)Slow-growing, clearly demarcated, pigmented, 'stuck-on' dermal lesions that may form skin tags, occurring especially around the neck in obese individuals
PremalignantSolar keratosesSlow-growing pink/grey-brown scaly epidermal lesions occurring in sun-exposed
skin (dorsa of hands, lower leg, face, bald pate) in subjects >60 years of age; lesions should be regularly monitored as they may undergo malignant changes
Bowen's diseaseIntraepidermal carcinoma (epithelioma) presenting as a small, slow-growing scaly plaque that can become nodular or ulcerate if the lesion extends into the dermis; these lesions should be removed or treated with a topical chemotherapeutic agent such as 5-fluorouracil
MalignantSquamous cell carcinomaKeratotic, scaly, elevated or nodular lesion with a depressed centre that may ulcerate, arising in sun-exposed skin; these lesions must undergo biopsy as they may metastasize
Basal cell carcinoma (rodent ulcer)Low-grade malignant lesion due to a locally invasive epidermal tumour, with a pearly raised edge and a tendency to central ulceration; these lesions must be biopsied as they may metastasize
Malignant melanomaVirulent skin tumour, with 30% of incidence involving lower limb, most commonly occurring after 40 years of age in areas of sun-exposed or non-sun-exposed skin; lesions classically are raised, itchy, may bleed and show an irregular border and irregular pigmentation and/or Hutchinson's sign; these lesions must be biopsied as they may metastasize

neoplasm (nēˈ·ō·plaˑ·zm),

n an abnormally growing tissue in the body, such as cancer.

ne·o·plasm

(nē'ō-plazm)
Abnormal tissue that grows by cellular proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease; may be either benign or malignant.
[G. neo- new + G. plasma, thing formed]

neoplasm,

n (tumor), an abnormal mass of tissue, the growth of which exceeds and is uncoordinated with that of the normal tissues. It persists in the same excessive manner after cessation of the stimuli that evoked the change. Benign and malignant forms are recognized. See also neoplasia and tumor.

neoplasm

1. a tumor.
2. any new and abnormal growth, specifically one in which cell multiplication is uncontrolled and progressive. Neoplasms may be benign or malignant. Neoplasms of particular organs and of particular cell types are to be found under their individual headings, e.g. pharyngeal, adenocarcinoma.

benign neoplasm
a neoplasm having none of the characteristics of a malignant neoplasm (see below), i.e. it grows slowly, expands without metastasis, and usually does not recur.
neoplasm fever
due to extensive necrosis in rapidly growing tumors.
histoid neoplasm
a neoplasm whose cells and organization resemble those of the tissue from which it is growing.
malignant neoplasm
a neoplasm with the characteristics of anaplasia, invasiveness and metastasis.
organoid neoplasm
a neoplasm whose cellular architecture resembles that of some organ in the body.
transmissible neoplasm
a neoplasm capable of being transmitted between individuals. Includes bovine viral leukosis, avian leukosis, rous sarcoma complex, marek's disease, canine transmissible venereal tumor, squamous cell carcinoma of cattle, and canine viral papillomatosis.

Patient discussion about neoplasm

Q. What is a brain tumor?

A. A brain tumour is any intracranial tumor normally either in the brain itself in the cranial nerves, in the brain envelopes, skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors). It is created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division. Primary (true) brain tumors (which start in the brain) are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

Q. Is this a tumor? I felt a lump in my breast a few days ago in the shower. Is this a Tumor? Help! I'm scared.

A. If you felt a lump in your breast then you should go see your Doctor to check whether or not it is something that could be dangerous.

Q. what is carcinoid tumors? I had my appendix removed and the doctor came in the room very shocked and said it was full of carcinoid tumors. Im scared to get them somewhere else.

A. ya I have pain all the time but the doctors wont give me anything cuz im so young they don't want me hooked on anything. thank you sooo much for being so kind.

More discussions about neoplasm
References in periodicals archive ?
Abundant mucin in the background of the MCNs could be helpful in differentiation of these lesions from serous cystic neoplasms or pseudocysts.
Coverage of the Malignant Neoplasms pipeline on the basis of route of administration and molecule type.
The CNS neoplasms continued showing a poor prognosis with 5-year OS rate of less than 50%.
7% in the controls; the prevalence of benign neoplasms was 24.
78 times higher for chronic constipation (CC) patients and the risk of developing benign neoplasms was 2.
The differential diagnosis includes simple cysts, echinococcal cysts, liver abscesses, cystic degeneration of a liver neoplasm, Caroli's disease, posttraumatic cysts, and polycystic diseases.
The risk applies to all types of colonic neoplasms and appears to increase with advancing stage of the neoplasm from hyperplastic and adenomatous polyps to tubulovillous adenoma, adenoma with high-grade dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma.
Process used to identify randomized controlled trials for prostatic neoplasms in 1997 using MEDLINE and manual exclusion.
Calretinin and inhibin are useful in separating adrenocortical neoplasms from pheochromocytomas.
Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm (SPEN) of the pancreas is an uncommon, typically benign, neoplasm, which is predominately seen in young females of non-Caucasian descent.
The 10% incidence of malignancy in neoplasms of the submandibular gland in our series is much lower than the 50% reported in the literature.
Described as the "largest population-based study of absolute and relative risk of second malignant neoplasms," the study involved 16,540 survivors whose records were found in 13 cancer registries in New South Wales, Australia; British Columbia, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, Canada; the Nordic countries; Singapore; Slovenia; Zaragoza, Spain; and Scotland.