Neoplasia

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neoplasia

/neo·pla·sia/ (-pla?zhah) the formation of a neoplasm.
cervical intraepithelial neoplasia  (CIN) dysplasia of the cervical epithelium, often premalignant, characterized by various degrees of hyperplasia, abnormal keratinization, and the presence of condylomata.
gestational trophoblastic neoplasia  (GTN) a group of neoplastic disorders that originate in the placenta, including hydatidiform mole, chorioadenoma destruens, and choriocarcinoma.
multiple endocrine neoplasia  (MEN) a group of rare diseases caused by genetic defects that lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of two or more components of the endocrine system; type I is characterized by tumors of the pituitary, parathyroid glands, and pancreatic islet cells, with peptic ulcers and sometimes Zollinger-Ellison syndrome; type II is characterized by thyroid medullary carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, and parathyroid hyperplasia; type III is similar to type II but includes neuromas of the oral region, neurofibromas, ganglioneuromas of the gastrointestinal tract, and cafe-au-lait spots.

ne·o·pla·sia

(nē′ō-plā′zhə)
n.
The pathological process that results in the formation and growth of a neoplasm.

Neoplasia

Abnormal growth of cells, which may lead to a neoplasm, or tumor.
Mentioned in: Pap Test

neoplasia

[nē′ōplā′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, neos + plassein, to mold
the new and abnormal development of cells that may be benign or malignant. neoplastic [-plas′tik] , adj.

neoplasia

 [ne″o-pla´zhah]
the formation of a neoplasm.
cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) dysplasia of the cervical epithelium, often premalignant, characterized by various degrees of hyperplasia, abnormal keratinization, and the presence of condylomata.
multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) a group of rare hereditary disorders of autonomous hyperfunction of more than one endocrine gland. In Type I (MEN I), called also Wermer's syndrome, there are tumors of the pituitary, parathyroid gland, and pancreatic islet cells in association with a high incidence of peptic ulcer. Type II (MEN II), called also Sipple's syndrome, is characterized by medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, pheochromocytoma, often bilateral and multiple, and parathyroid hyperplasia. Type III (MEN III), called also mucosal neuroma syndrome, resembles Type II except that parathyroid hyperplasia is rare, the mean survival time is shorter, and there may be neuromas and neurofibromas. All forms are transmitted as autosomal dominant traits.

neoplasia (nē´ōplā´zhə),

n the disease process responsible for neoplasm formation. See also neoplasm.

neoplasia

the formation of a neoplasm.

neoplasia

 Oncology Abnormal and uncontrolled cell growth. See Anal intraepithelial neoplasia, Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, Ductal intraepithelial neoplasia, Hereditary neoplasia, Hereditary preneoplasia, Papillary neoplasia, Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia.

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă),
The pathologic process that results in the formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă)
The pathologic process that results in the formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă)
The pathologic process that results in formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]

neoplasia

abnormal cell proliferation generating tissue that is characterized by rapid and non-controlled cell division, poor cellular differentiation, and which is potentially cancerous

Patient discussion about Neoplasia

Q. What is a brain tumor?

A. A brain tumour is any intracranial tumor normally either in the brain itself in the cranial nerves, in the brain envelopes, skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors). It is created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division. Primary (true) brain tumors (which start in the brain) are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

Q. Is this a tumor? I felt a lump in my breast a few days ago in the shower. Is this a Tumor? Help! I'm scared.

A. If you felt a lump in your breast then you should go see your Doctor to check whether or not it is something that could be dangerous.

Q. what is carcinoid tumors? I had my appendix removed and the doctor came in the room very shocked and said it was full of carcinoid tumors. Im scared to get them somewhere else.

A. ya I have pain all the time but the doctors wont give me anything cuz im so young they don't want me hooked on anything. thank you sooo much for being so kind.

More discussions about Neoplasia
References in periodicals archive ?
The diagnostic yield for advanced neoplasias of 10 mm or more, which included all cancers, was 1.
In both cases from Chile, the authors reported disseminated neoplasias primarily affecting connective tissue associated with the digestive system, causing its destruction.
No neoplasias were found in the younger group, compared with five (19.