neoplasia

(redirected from Neoplasias)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Neoplasias: neoplastic, Neoplastic tissue

neoplasia

 [ne″o-pla´zhah]
the formation of a neoplasm.
cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) dysplasia of the cervical epithelium, often premalignant, characterized by various degrees of hyperplasia, abnormal keratinization, and the presence of condylomata.
multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) a group of rare hereditary disorders of autonomous hyperfunction of more than one endocrine gland. In Type I (MEN I), called also Wermer's syndrome, there are tumors of the pituitary, parathyroid gland, and pancreatic islet cells in association with a high incidence of peptic ulcer. Type II (MEN II), called also Sipple's syndrome, is characterized by medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, pheochromocytoma, often bilateral and multiple, and parathyroid hyperplasia. Type III (MEN III), called also mucosal neuroma syndrome, resembles Type II except that parathyroid hyperplasia is rare, the mean survival time is shorter, and there may be neuromas and neurofibromas. All forms are transmitted as autosomal dominant traits.

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă),
The pathologic process that results in the formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]

neoplasia

/neo·pla·sia/ (-pla´zhah) the formation of a neoplasm.
cervical intraepithelial neoplasia  (CIN) dysplasia of the cervical epithelium, often premalignant, characterized by various degrees of hyperplasia, abnormal keratinization, and the presence of condylomata.
gestational trophoblastic neoplasia  (GTN) a group of neoplastic disorders that originate in the placenta, including hydatidiform mole, chorioadenoma destruens, and choriocarcinoma.
multiple endocrine neoplasia  (MEN) a group of rare diseases caused by genetic defects that lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of two or more components of the endocrine system; type I is characterized by tumors of the pituitary, parathyroid glands, and pancreatic islet cells, with peptic ulcers and sometimes Zollinger-Ellison syndrome; type II is characterized by thyroid medullary carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, and parathyroid hyperplasia; type III is similar to type II but includes neuromas of the oral region, neurofibromas, ganglioneuromas of the gastrointestinal tract, and café-au-lait spots.

neoplasia

(nē′ō-plā′zhə)
n.
1. Formation of new tissue.
2. Formation of a neoplasm or neoplasms.

neoplasia

[nē′ōplā′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, neos + plassein, to mold
the new and abnormal development of cells that may be benign or malignant. neoplastic [-plas′tik] , adj.

neoplasia

 Oncology Abnormal and uncontrolled cell growth. See Anal intraepithelial neoplasia, Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, Ductal intraepithelial neoplasia, Hereditary neoplasia, Hereditary preneoplasia, Papillary neoplasia, Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia.

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă)
The pathologic process that results in the formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]

neoplasia

The process of tumour formation.

Neoplasia

Abnormal growth of cells, which may lead to a neoplasm, or tumor.
Mentioned in: Pap Test

neoplasia

abnormal cell proliferation generating tissue that is characterized by rapid and non-controlled cell division, poor cellular differentiation, and which is potentially cancerous

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă)
The pathologic process that results in formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]

neoplasia (nē´ōplā´zhə),

n the disease process responsible for neoplasm formation. See also neoplasm.

neoplasia

the formation of a neoplasm.

Patient discussion about neoplasia

Q. What is a brain tumor?

A. A brain tumour is any intracranial tumor normally either in the brain itself in the cranial nerves, in the brain envelopes, skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors). It is created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division. Primary (true) brain tumors (which start in the brain) are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

Q. Is this a tumor? I felt a lump in my breast a few days ago in the shower. Is this a Tumor? Help! I'm scared.

A. If you felt a lump in your breast then you should go see your Doctor to check whether or not it is something that could be dangerous.

Q. what is carcinoid tumors? I had my appendix removed and the doctor came in the room very shocked and said it was full of carcinoid tumors. Im scared to get them somewhere else.

A. ya I have pain all the time but the doctors wont give me anything cuz im so young they don't want me hooked on anything. thank you sooo much for being so kind.

More discussions about neoplasia
References in periodicals archive ?
6) Several risk factors have been identified for anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN), including anal intercourse, intravenous drug use, abnormal cervical cytology, young age, HIV infection/low CD4 count, and anal or cervical HPV infection.
The diagnostic yield for all advanced neoplasia was significantly higher for colonoscopy: 8.
For disseminated neoplasias, there is only one case reporting differences in sex affected (Brousseau & Baglivo 1994), whereas there are numerous reports for gonadal neoplasia (e.
Among the women aged younger than 40 years (none of whom had overt cancer), the risk for neoplasia with abnormal bleeding was 2.
Las neoplasias mamarias caninas se han agrupado de acuerdo a criterios histogenico, morfologico descriptivo y pronostico, resultando en clasificaciones innecesariamente complejas y de dificil aplicacion.
All patients went for a pancreatectomy, 7% had an asymptomatic cancer (two with N1 adenocarcinomas) and 16% had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN), a cancer precursor lesion.
Despite this increased risk, the heightened inflammation associated with IBD makes it more difficult to detect colorectal neoplasia with colonoscopy than in those without IBD.
1) The role of HPV in the genesis of squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, (2) anogenital region, (3) carcinoma of the head and neck, (4) and oral mucosa is well established, but its role in ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is still unclear.
On multivariate analysis examining the risk of colorectal neoplasia associated with sex, age, disease duration, and extensive colitis, the presence of extensive colitis significantly increased the risk of neoplasia sevenfold, compared with the expected number of cases obtained from the national French cancer registries.
Flexible sigmoidoscopy is inadequate for predicting advanced neoplasia in the proximal colon in women, making colonoscopy the preferred method of screening for colorectal cancer, according to the results of a prospective study.
In situ lobular neoplasia (LN) of the breast was first documented by Ewing (1) in 1919 in 2 photomicrographs with the captions "atypical proliferation of acinar cells" and "precancerous changes .