neologism

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neologism

 [ne-ol´o-jizm]
a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it; see also word salad.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ō-jizm),
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (for example, headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the patient's condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

/ne·ol·o·gism/ (ne-ol´ah-jizm) a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a new word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it.

neologism

(nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.

neologism

[nē·ol′əjiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, neos + logos, word
1 a word or term newly coined or used with a new meaning.
2 (in psychiatry) a word coined by a psychotic or delirious patient that is meaningful only to the patient.

neologism

Neurology/psychiatry A word created by a Pt with a mental disorder or dementia, which includes new usages for standard words and ad hoc substitutes for names forgotten by a Pt; neologisms are created by Pts with schizophrenia and organic mental disorders

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ŏ-jizm)
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (e.g., headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the underlying condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

1. A newly coined word or phrase.
2. A meaningless word used by a psychotic person.
References in periodicals archive ?
The words and syntax of the soldier come from the higher register of Afrikaans and contain a neologism 'honderdman', literally 'hundredman', Louw's invention for a centurion.
on a finite level, [existing] as a reality essence (a metareality) involving a persuasive consciousness (information expressed through meaning as metaconsciousness) and order (ordropy [another neologism, M.
This volume contains thirteen essays on neologisms in the general language and in the specialized technolects of early modern Spain.
James Mancuso (eg, 11-124) mostly coins realistic neologisms, like Barbara Wallraff's Word Fugutives, as possible real words.
Even more grating is the increase in marketing speak, littered with buzzwords and ludicrous neologisms.
New Latina/o authors are creating intimacy with the reader in the context of a complex diversity that has required two neologisms.
Not only are neologisms -- new words, phrases and expressions -- engaging and entertaining, they are a serious area of linguistic study and a window into our society as the English language continues to evolve.
Among the other innovative features are revised etymologies by Alberto Nocentini and Alessandro Parenti, in which the date or century of first attestations was added, (6) neologisms drawn especially from the scientific sector compiled by Beatrice Manetti and Silvia Rati, with terms such as iPod, sudoku, PACS, election day, etc.
This dictionary tries to include as much of the current medical argot as possible within the restraints of its concise nature and the author makes no apology for including the 'real-world' usage of neologisms, jargon, acronyms and casual speech.
Focusing on the real-world language of practice, Segen (histopathology, Chase Farm Hospital, Enfield, UK) provides comprehensive definitions of terminology, jargon, acronyms, and neologisms in clear, simple language.
The word "photography" is just such a neologism itself, and its history is rife with further neologisms.
How many of us have sat in meetings, mentally counting the vile euphemisms, the hideous neologisms and jargon that spew forth?