Nelson syndrome

Nel·son syn·drome

(nel'sŏn),
a syndrome of hyperpigmentation, third cranial nerve damage, and enlarging sella turcica caused by pituitary adenomas presumably present before adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome but enlarging and symptomatic afterward.

Nelson syndrome

(nĕl′sən)
n.
A syndrome caused by rapid growth of a pituitary tumor after bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing disease, marked by hyperpigmentation of the skin, headaches, and vision disturbances.

Nel·son syn·drome

(nel'sŏn sin'drōm)
A syndrome of hyperpigmentation, third nerve damage, and enlarging sella turcica caused by pituitary adenomas presumably present before adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome but enlarging and symptomatic afterward.
Synonym(s): postadrenalectomy syndrome.

Nelson,

Don H., U.S. internist, 1925–.
Nelson syndrome - hyperpigmentation, third nerve damage, and enlarging sella turcica caused by pituitary adenomas that become symptomatic following adrenalectomy. Synonym(s): postadrenalectomy syndrome
Nelson tumor - a pituitary tumor causing the symptoms of Nelson syndrome.

Nel·son syn·drome

(nel'sŏn sin'drōm)
Disorder of hyperpigmentation, third cranial nerve damage, and enlarging sella turcica caused by pituitary adenomas presumably present before adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
They discuss hypothalamic function and pathophysiology, including vasopressin, oxytocin, and corticotropin-releasing hormone and neuroendocrine regulation, stress and water metabolism, and their role as mediators of emotional and social behaviors; new developments in disorders of the pituitary gland, including active and inactive adenomas, Rathke's cleft cysts, craniopharyngioma, and unusual forms of hypopituitarism; and controversial issues like Nelson syndrome, familial pituitary tumors, and autoimmune hypophysitis, as well as central adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency, the irreversible consequences of pituitary tumors and their treatment on quality of life and neuropsychologic function, and neuroendocrine mechanisms in adaptation to exercise.
One of the two patients, who developed Nelson syndrome following the bilateral surrenalectomy, underwent transsphenoidal adenomectomy, and the other was treated with conventional radyotherapy (5000 Rad).
Whitby's instant dismissal of a thoughtful report by Iain Duncan Smith's Centre for Policy Justice is very much part of what might be termed the Lord Nelson Syndrome - I see no problems.

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