Neisseria


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Neisseria

 [ni-se´re-ah]
a genus of gram-negative, aerobic or facultatively anaerobic cocci, which are a part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, nasopharynx, and genitourinary tract. Pathogenic species include N. gonorrhoe´ae, the etiologic agent of gonorrhea; N. meningi´tidis, a prominent cause of meningitis and the specific agent of meningococcal meningitis; and N. muco´sa, which is found in the nasopharynx and occasionally causes pneumonia.

Neisseria

(nī-sē'rē-ă),
A genus of aerobic bacteria (family Neisseriaceae) containing gram-negative cocci that occur in pairs with the adjacent sides flattened. These organisms are parasites of animals. The type species is Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
[A. Neisser]

neis·se·ri·a

, pl.

neis·se·ri·ae

(nī-sē'rē-ă, nī-sē'rē-ē),
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Neisseria.

Neisseria

/Neis·se·ria/ (ni-sēr´e-ah) a genus of gram-negative bacteria (family Neisseriaceae), including N. gonorrhoe´ae, the etiologic agent of gonorrhea, N. meningi´tidis, a prominent cause of meningitis and the specific etiologic agent of meningococcal meningitis.

Neisseria

[nīser′ē·ə]
Etymology: Albert L.S. Neisser, Polish dermatologist, 1855-1916
a genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria of the family Neisseriaceae. The gram-negative cocci, which appear in pairs with adjacent sides flattened, are among the normal flora of genitourinary and upper respiratory tracts. Pathogenic species include gonococcus and meningococcus forms.

Neis·se·ri·a

(nī-sē'rē-ă)
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria containing gram-negative cocci that occur in pairs with the adjacent sides flattened.
[A. Neisser]

neis·se·ri·a

, pl. neisseriae (nī-sē'rē-ă, -ē)
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Neisseria.

Neisseria

(ni-se're-a)
[Albert Neisser, Ger. physician, 1855–1916]
A genus of gram-negative diplococci of the family Neisseriaceae. The most significant human pathogens are Neisseria meningitidis (the meningococcus) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (the gonococcus)

Neisseria catarrhalis

See: Moraxella catarrhalis
Enlarge picture
NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE WITHIN A POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTE: (Orig. mag. ×500)
Enlarge picture
NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE WITHIN A POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTE

Neisseria gonorrhoeae

The species causing gonorrhea. Synonym: gonococcus
See: illustration; gonorrheaillustration

Neisseria meningitidis

The species causing epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis.
See: meningitis

Neisseria sicca

Species found in mucous membrane of the respiratory tract. Occasionally, this species may cause bacterial endocarditis.

Neisseria,

A genus of small, aerobic, GRAM NEGATIVE micro-organisms occurring in pairs (diplococci) that includes Neisseria gonorrhoea , the cause of GONORRHOEA and Neisseria meningitidis the cause of epidemic cerebrospinal MENINGITIS. (Albert Ludwig Siegmund Neisser, 1855–1916, German dermatologist).

Neisser,

Albert Ludwig S., German physician, 1855-1916.
Neisseria catarrhalis
Neisseria flavescens
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - a species that causes gonorrhea in humans. Synonym(s): Neisser coccus
Neisseria lactamica
Neisseria meningitidis
Neisseria sicca
Neisseria subflava
Neisseria - a genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Neisseriaceae) that are parasites of animals.
Neisseria mucosa
Neisser coccus - Synonym(s): Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Neisser diplococcus
Neisser syringe - a urethral syringe used in treatment of gonococcal urethritis.

Neisseria

genus of aerobic or facultative anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria

Neis·se·ri·a

(nī-sē'rē-ă)
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria containing gram-negative cocci that occur in pairs with the adjacent sides flattened.
[A. Neisser]

Neisseria

a genus of gram-negative bacteria in the family Neisseriaceae. Commonly found as normal flora in the oral cavity and respiratory tract of many species and only rarely associated with disease except in humans where N. meningitidis is the cause of meningococcal meningitis, and N. gonorrheae is the cause of gonorrhea.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the University of California Los Angeles, the use of gyrA genotyping has decreased the use of ceftriaxone for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections from 94 percent prior to assay implementation to 78 percent after; there was also a concomitant increase in the use of targeted ciprofloxacin therapy.
Neisseria meningitidis contains a polysaccharide capsule, which protects meningococci against the host immune system and from serum bactericidal activity.
Increase in endemic Neisseria meningitidis capsular group W sequence type 11 complex associated with severe invasive disease in England and Wales.
So the isolates which, with culture methods were Neisseria gonoroheae, with molecular method were confirmed as Neisseria gonoroheae too.
Laboratory methods for the diagnosis of meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenza.
Neisseria meningitidis urethritis: a case report highlighting clinical similarities to and epidemiological differences from gonococcal urethritis.
The report reviews key players involved in the therapeutics development for Neisseria Meningitidis Infections and enlists all their major and minor projects
The ticking time bomb: escalating antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a public health disaster in waiting.
Menveo is a quadrivalent conjugate vaccine for use to protect against invasive disease caused by four groups of the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis (A, C, Y and W-135)1.
All cases the neisseria meningitidis involve foreigners coming into the
Isolation of Invasive Strains of Neisseria meningitides, Serogroups B and Y, in Cumana, 2009-2010
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urged doctors to be on the lookout for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a bacterial strain that causes the disease and can grow and multiply, which is resistant to cephalosporin, a common treatment used for the disease that over the last decade has failed to, and to report the antibiotic-resistant cases quickly.