needlestick injury

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needlestick injury

Infection control The unintentional exposure of a health care worker to a needle used in direct Pt management. See Hospital-acquired penetration contacts, Sharps.

needlestick injury

The actual or potential harm caused by accidentally pricking oneself with a needle after giving an injection or taking blood. Needlestick injury has acquired greater significance since AIDS and HEPATITIS B have become so prevalent. Medical personnel routinely discard ‘sharps’ into special safe containers without first re-sheathing hypodermic needles. Sheathing readily leads to pricking.

needlestick injury

accidental penetration of the clinician's soft tissues by a used (blood-contaminated) needle; local protocols must be followed exactly after sustaining a needlestick injury, to reduce likelihood of blood-borne cross-infection
References in periodicals archive ?
The second worker was also transported back to London from Sierra Leone after a needle-stick injury while treating someone with the virus.
Fabris are working to radically improve the mechanical properties of a glove that could retain its flexibility and smooth texture, offering healthcare professionals the highest level of needle-stick protection without compromising tactile sensation and manual dexterity.
Radiometer's safePICO70 arterial blood gas syringes offer a proven, safe and easy to use way of meeting the specific requirements of the directive, helping to eliminate needle-stick injuries and protect staff from exposure to patient blood.
The probability that a single needle-stick will result in disease is 300 chances in 1000 for HBV, and 20-50 chances in 1000 for HCV, which is considerably higher than the documented 3 per 1000 injuries for HIV (E-Facts 2011:2; Wilburn 2004:2)
postgraduate medical residency programs from July 2002 through May 2003 found that needle-stick injuries and cuts were most frequent during extended work shifts that lasted longer than 24 hours and were more frequent during the 11:30 p.
The new standard, which took effect in April and has been enforced since July, puts teeth into a 1991 recommendation on blood-borne pathogens that encouraged employers to evaluate and implement devices to improve workplace safety by minimizing the risk of blood exposure through needle-stick or other injuries.
Case #2: An officer received a needle-stick injury while conducting a personal search following an arrest.
And even when incidents do not result in infection, the cost of follow-up for a high-risk exposure can exceed $3,000 per needle-stick injury.
Ongoing studies show that the risk of being infected with AIDS following a needle-stick injury is less than 1 percent, he says, and none of the nearly 400 workers put under observation after having mucous membranes or open wounds exposed to blood of AIDS patients has tested positive for the virus.
Needle-Stick Injury Prevention with Passive Safety Device
The Philadelphia school needle-stick near-tragedy -- where last week a third-grader stuck 19 fellow students with her mother's diabetic needle -- is just the tip of the iceberg.
From the administrator's standpoint, Bioject injections reduce the potential for needle-stick injuries to the medical staff.