needlestick injury

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needlestick injury

Infection control The unintentional exposure of a health care worker to a needle used in direct Pt management. See Hospital-acquired penetration contacts, Sharps.

needlestick injury

The actual or potential harm caused by accidentally pricking oneself with a needle after giving an injection or taking blood. Needlestick injury has acquired greater significance since AIDS and HEPATITIS B have become so prevalent. Medical personnel routinely discard ‘sharps’ into special safe containers without first re-sheathing hypodermic needles. Sheathing readily leads to pricking.

needlestick injury

accidental penetration of the clinician's soft tissues by a used (blood-contaminated) needle; local protocols must be followed exactly after sustaining a needlestick injury, to reduce likelihood of blood-borne cross-infection
References in periodicals archive ?
The prevalence of needle-stick injuries was found to be 85(44%) in public and 51(26.
Knowledge, attitude and practices among health care workers on needle-stick injuries.
The second worker was also transported back to London from Sierra Leone after a needle-stick injury while treating someone with the virus.
The NovaGuard SA safety system reportedly helps reduce the risk of needle-stick injuries by shielding the exposed needle of a prefilled syringe after use.
Nurses have the highest rate of needle-stick injury among healthcare workers due to their maximum exposure to the needles and other sharp instruments3.
Stein et al [14] stated that 37% of the respondents (doctors and nurses) had suffered a needle-stick injury with a used needle, with doctors more likely to be injured than nurses.
Rates of needle-stick injury caused by various devices in a university hospital.
postgraduate medical residency programs from July 2002 through May 2003 found that needle-stick injuries and cuts were most frequent during extended work shifts that lasted longer than 24 hours and were more frequent during the 11:30 p.
About 600,000-800,000 needle-stick or other percutaneous injuries are reported each year, many of which occur not during medical procedures but afterward during clean-up activities.
For the first time, the government is specifying the types of devices that should be used to reduce the risk of needle-stick injuries.
The Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act, overseen by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, requires employers, including office-based physicians with at least 11 employees, to discuss safer devices with staff members who deliver patient care and potentially would be exposed to needle-stick injuries.
An estimated 20,000 needle-stick injuries occur annually in the state, with as many as 1,000 people becoming infected with hepatitis C and HIV, among other diseases, because of them.