Necator

(redirected from Necator suillus)

Necator

 [ne-ka´tor]
a genus of hookworms. N. america´nus is the New World or American hookworm, a species widely distributed in the southern United States, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.

Necator

(nē-kā'tŏr),
A genus of nematode hookworms (family Ancylostomatidae, subfamily Necatorinae) distinguished by two chitinous cutting plates in the buccal cavity and fused male copulatory spicules. Species include Necator americanus, the so-called New World hookworm (although it is also prevalent in the tropics of Africa, southern Asia, and Polynesia); the adults of this species attach to villi in the small intestine and suck blood, causing abdominal discomfort, diarrhea (usually with melena) and cramps, anorexia, loss of weight, and hypochromic microcytic anemia, which may occur in advanced disease.
See also: Ancylostoma.
[L. a murderer]

Necator

/Ne·ca·tor/ (ne-kāt´or) a genus of hookworms. N. america´nus (American or New World hookworm) causes hookworm disease.

Ne·ca·tor

(nĕ-kā'tŏr)
A genus of nematode hookworms with species that include N. americanus, the New World hookworm; the adults of this species attach to villi in the small intestine and suck blood, causing abdominal discomfort, diarrhea and cramps, anorexia, weight loss, and hypochromic microcytic anemia.
See also: Ancylostoma
[L. a murderer]

Necator

(ne-ka'tor) [L., murderer]
A genus of parasitic hookworms belonging to the family Ancylostomidae.
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NECATOR AMERICANUS
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NECATOR

Necator americanus

A parasitic hookworm found worldwide that is responsible for iron-deficiency anemia and impaired growth in children. See: hookworm; illustration
illustration

Necator

A genus of hookworms that parasitize the small intestine. The commonest species to affect humans is Necator americanus . Infection with this worm is common in Africa, Central and South America and the Pacific.

Necator

a genus of hookworm in the subfamily Necatorinae.

Necator americanus
the common hookworm of humans, found also in pigs and dogs.
Necator suillus
see N. americanus (above), found in pigs.