natural philosophy

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natural philosophy

An obsolescent term for physics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Always serious, never condescending, he was as brilliant a lecturer as he was an experimentalist and natural philosopher.
On the other hand, the people who founded the country in the late 18th century considered themselves natural philosophers.
5) In other terms, as the religious wars crushed the belief in the same one god, natural philosophers appealed to the supposed objective commonality of god's product, i.
Its first expression might be seen in the formation of a small group of natural philosophers in the area around London, England in the late seventeenth century.
The qualification 'laid the foundations' is important, since Hannam does not refer to the authors he discusses as 'scientists', the word not having been coined until 1833 (338), but instead as natural philosophers.
Aware of this instability, the seventeenth-century natural philosophers who probed nature's secrets made some effort to circumscribe the powers of nonhuman matter.
On this view, those natural philosophers who stressed God's freedom to act in the world, unbound by restrictions imposed by reason, were more likely to ground scientific knowledge in observations and experiments; whereas those who stressed God's reason were more likely to hold a rationalist conception of scientific knowledge and methods.
The history of fireworks reveals the range of relationships which existed between artisans and scientists (or natural philosophers as they were known before the 1830s).
Lewis's argument that natural philosophers aspired to develop an art of recollection, understood to be an intellectual method of abstracting knowledge from empirical data, seems to be the inspiration behind the book's title.
These figures range from images in fictional literature of talking brass heads to discussions of the homunculus by Renaissance natural philosophers and to Jewish legends of the golem.
Since the foundation of Stoic physics numerous natural philosophers have argued that the universe is a plenum that there is no such thing as empty space that all beings are held in a thick unseen aspic that makes the infinite flow of cause and effect possible.
Many of them, Ben Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and so forth, would have called themselves natural philosophers, the equivalent of scientists in that day.