natural family planning

(redirected from Natural family planning methods)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Natural family planning methods: calendar method

natural family planning

A general term for any form of family planning (birth control) that does not rely on artificial agents (oral contraceptives, the “morning-after” pill, spermicidal foam and RU486) or devices (condoms, diaphragms and IUDs) to prevent conception.

Methods
Rhythm (calendar method), coitus interruptus, prolonged breastfeeding.

natural family planning

Biological birth control Any FP that does not rely on artificial agents–eg, OCs, 'morning-after' pill, spermicidal foam, RU-486 or devices–eg, condoms, diaphragms, IUDs to prevent conception Methods Rhythm–calendar method, coitus interruptus, prolonged breast feeding. See Breast feeding, Coitus interruptus, Contraception, Pearl index, Periodic abstinence, Rhythm method.

natural family planning

1.
Fertility awareness.
2. A kind of fertility awareness in which a woman plots on a graph her daily basal body temperature, cervical mucus characteristics, and common subjective complaints associated with ovulation, e.g., mittelschmerz, to identify the days of the menstrual cycle during which there is the highest potential for conception. The validity of this method is controversial.
See also: family planning
References in periodicals archive ?
2) This provision assures that agencies that provide only natural family planning methods or that will not make direct referrals for abortion are eligible for Title X funding, but only if they are part of a Title X project that provides "a broad range" of methods and services, and only if they agree to refer to other facilities those patients who request services that the agencies are unwilling or unable to provide.
In the case of the Bolivian study, where natural family planning methods were the preference of the majority of the women, the researchers recommended that providers educate clients to use these methods effectively rather than trying to convince them to use other methods.
But in a 2009 article published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, authors Stephen Pallone and George Bergus concluded that data on the three natural family planning methods, or "fertility awareness-based methods," is "of insufficient quality to draw any valid conclusions.
Though data needed to precisely measure the effectiveness of natural family planning methods are not currently available, Pallone and Bergus wrote that existing evidence suggests the methods can be effective as a means of contraception.
Church teaching calls on Catholics who desire to regulate the size of their families to employ Natural Family Planning methods.
It may be that when the Guide recommends that "health associations and organizations promote the various methods of regulation of conception that respect a woman's natural fertility cycles," it intended to refer only to the natural family planning methods, such as the Creighton model, the Billings Ovulation method, or the Serena method.
Although it is generally known that surgical, chemical, and barrier contraceptive methods prevent the spread of HV, few people realize that misusing natural family planning methods also significantly "reduces the risk" of fully comprehending and embracing Humanae vitae.
The Health Care Guide states that professionals are to be well informed on natural family planning methods.