natural law

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natural law

a doctrine that holds that there is a natural moral order or law inherent in the structure of the universe.
References in periodicals archive ?
My main problem with van Dun's argument is the suggestion that Hayek needed Hume for a natural law theory.
thesis appears to be clearly incompatible with natural law theory.
While the new natural law theory is an impressive attempt to navigate between the Scylla and Charybdis of relativism and abstract rationalism, it is insufficient in several ways.
I would suggest the following reasons why natural law theory justifies, and, in fact, requires, a practice of informed consent that appears very homologous to its confused contemporary cousin.
This new addition to the study of Aquinas's social and political philosophy by one of the world's premier philosophers of natural law is an exciting and fruitful text, well worth serious reading by all of us interested in the burgeoning renewal of natural law theory as the new millennium begins.
A Natural Law Approach to Normativity presents an original perspective on natural law theory and will be of interest to academics in philosophy of law, moral/political philosophy, natural law theorists, and students of jurisprudence internationally.
Natural law theory treats the role of judge as itself fundamentally a matter for determinatio and not for direct translation from the natural law.
At least part of the progressive aversion to natural law theory, however, is likely rooted in a persistent hunch that there is something inherently conservative about natural law reasoning.
Sidney's political writings and poetics display, too, a thorough-going dependence on natural law theory.
For example, Professors Germain Grisez and John Finnis have recognized the importance of practical reason to natural law theory and have elaborated upon Aquinas's first principle.
This rejection of natural law theory will not sit well with many of those whom Epstein calls libertarian absolutists.
It is the distinction of Anthony Lisska's fine book that it gives some clarity and order to the manifold expressions of Thomistic ethics in the last thirty years or so, particularly concerning the issue of natural law theory.