Nasmyth


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Nas·myth

(nās'mith),
Alexander, London dentist, 1789-1849. See: Nasmyth cuticle, Nasmyth membrane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking about his inclusion in the Top 100 report Mr Smith said: "It's a great personal honour to have been named as one of the 100 top industry innovators in this prestigious report and I am grateful for the on-going support of everyone at Nasmyth Group.
Black Drop, a film by Turner Prize-winning artist Simon Starling, looks at the rare planetary phenomenon of the transit of Venus and, in documenting early moving image technology, also touches on the Nasmyth photos.
Nasmyth was a Scottish engineer, the inventor of the steam hammer and an amateur astronomer; Carpenter was a professional astronomer working at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich.
Argus' founder Jan Nasmyth previously won the IAEE award in 1988.
They included Mary MacLeod Moore, a writer for Saturday Night Magazine and the London Sunday Times and Beatrice Sifton Nasmyth, a freelance reporter for the Vancouver Province.
Until now, the most famous image of Burns was the 18th-century portrait by Alexander Nasmyth, which hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh.
The telescopes are altitude-azimuth mounted with Spectral Instruments science cameras at their Nasmyth foci.
Among the iconic works held at the stunning Victorian Gothic building on Queen Street is the world's best-known portrait of Robert Burns, by Alexander Nasmyth, and of Mary, Queen of Scots.
24 Cassegrain, Newtonian and Nasmyth are types of what kind of scientific apparatus?
He intends the portrait to show Nasmyth as he really is, not as he presents himself to the world.
Corporate finance partner Paul Thompson, director Jat Narjan and guest speaker Peter Smith, chairman and chief executive of the Nasmyth Group, gave insights at the event at the National Motorcycle Museum, Solihull.
Gray indicates that her source was a conversation with Monica Newton, a niece to Johnson's friend and colleague, Beatrice Nasmyth (416).