mucus

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Related to Nasal mucus: Dried nasal mucus

mucus

 [mu´kus]
the free slime of the mucous membrane, composed of the secretion of its glands, various salts, desquamated cells, and leukocytes.
cervical mucus that constituting the mucous membrane of the uterine cervix; it undergoes chemical and physical changes owing to hormone stimulation during the menstrual cycle and plays an important role in helping spermatozoa travel inwards after coitus. See also discussion of the cervical mucus method of contraception, under contraception.
fertile mucus see ovulation method of contraception.

mu·cus

(myū'kŭs), Do not confuse this noun with the adjective mucous.
The clear viscid secretion of the mucous membranes, consisting of mucin, epithelial cells, leukocytes, and various inorganic salts dissolved in water.
[L.]

mucus

/mu·cus/ (mu´kus) the free slime of the mucous membranes, composed of secretion of the glands, various salts, desquamated cells, and leukocytes.

mucus

(myo͞o′kəs)
n.
The viscous, slippery substance that consists chiefly of mucin, water, cells, and inorganic salts and is secreted as a protective lubricant coating by cells and glands of the mucous membranes.

mucus

[myo̅o̅′kəs]
Etymology: L, slime
the viscous, slippery secretions of mucous membranes and glands, containing mucin, white blood cells, water, inorganic salts, and exfoliated cells. mucoid, adj., mucous [myo̅o̅'kəs] , adj.

mucus

A clear viscid fluid produced by various mucosae–eg, nose, mouth, throat, vagina, containing mucopolysaccharides, enzymes, IgA, and other proteins, desquamated epithelial cells, inorganic salts in fluid. See Cervical mucus.

mu·cus

(myū'kŭs)
The clear viscid secretion of the mucous membranes, consisting of mucin, epithelial cells, leukocytes, and various inorganic salts suspended in water.
[L.]

mucus

A slimy, jelly-like material, chemically known as a MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDE or GLYCOPROTEIN, produced by the goblet cells of MUCOUS MEMBRANES. Mucus has important lubricating and protective properties. It prevents acid and enzymes from digesting the walls of the stomach and intestines. It traps fine particulate matter, including smoke, in the lungs. It lubricates swallowing and the transport of the bowel contents. It facilitates sexual intercourse.

mucus

  1. any slimy or sticky material secreted by invertebrate animals or plants.
  2. a viscous slimy solution of the protein MUCIN secreted by the MUCOUS MEMBRANES of vertebrates.

Mucus

Thick, viscous, gel-like material that functions to moisten and protect inner body surfaces.

mucus (myōōˑ·ks),

n a thick, slippery discharge that comprises white blood cells, mucin, inorganic salts, water, and exfoliated cells produced by the mucous membranes. Functions to moisten and protect them.

mucus

A clear viscous secretion of mucous membranes consisting mainly of mucin, as well as inorganic salts suspended in water.

mu·cus

(myū'kŭs) Do not confuse this noun with the adjective mucous.
Clear viscid secretion of the mucous membranes, consisting of mucin, epithelial cells, leukocytes, and various inorganic salts dissolved in water.
[L.]

mucus

(mū´kus),
n the viscous, slippery secretions of mucous membranes and glands, containing mucin, white blood cells, water, inorganic salts, and exfoliated cells.

mucus

the free slime of the mucous membrane, composed of the secretion of its glands, various salts, desquamated cells and leukocytes. See also mucous.

mucus agglutination test
an agglutination test carried out on mucus, e.g. the test for the presence of antibodies to Campylobacter spp. carried out on vaginal mucus.
gastric mucus
a protective gelatinous material coating gastric mucosal cells.
respiratory mucus
part of the protective mucociliary blanket of the upper respiratory tract.
vaginal mucus
the appearance of the mucus from the cow's vagina is a good indication that she is in estrus. Laboratory examination of the mucus for cell patterns and arborization is used to determine the stage of reproduction in bitches.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, too often clinicians have seen patients with yellow and green nasal mucus (or any increased nasal mucus) and diagnosed "a bacterial infection" and prescribed antibiotics.
We all have nasal mucus which is normal and keeps the airway passages moist.
The first factor is the presence of lysozyme, lactoferrin, and other immunologically active proteins, including immunoglobulin A (IgA), which are found in normal nasal mucus.
The cellulose-based product works by supporting the production of nasal mucus, thus eliminating nasal dryness and protecting the integrity of the nasal passages, while improving the quality of air breathed.
Salt water (saline) nose drops or spray will help loosen up any dried nasal mucus, making it easy for your child to clear his nose.
Bacterial meningitis is often spread by direct contact with saliva, spit or nasal mucus of someone infected.
Reported symptoms included fatigue, dizziness, postnasal drip, sinus headache or pressure, nasal blockage, skin rashes, earache, eye itching or burning, sore throat, wheezing, sneezing, chest tightness, and green/yellow nasal mucus.
Meanwhile, controversy lingers from a 1999 report that 96% of 210 consecutive patients with chronic rhinosinusitis had positive fungal nasal mucus cultures, and that allergic mucin was found in 96% of 101 consecutive surgical patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (Mayo Clin.
Moreover, all of the patients enrolled in the study had their nasal mucus test positive for eMBP (eosinophilic major basic protein positive).
Washington, Dec 2 (ANI): A new study in mice has found out that enzymes in nasal mucus change certain scents well before the nose can detect them.
He found that the amounts of two pivotal signal-messenger compounds, cyclic-AMP and cyclic-GMP, in nasal mucus correlated with the ability to smell.
It has been discovered that chicken contains an amino acid called cysteine that eases that bunged-up feeling by preventing inflammation of the nasal passages and thinning nasal mucus.