Napier grass


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Related to Napier grass: Para grass, Elephant Grass

Napier grass

Pennisetum purpureum. Called also elephant grass.
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The desmodium repels (pushes) the pests from the maize and the napier grass attracts (pulls) the stem borers out of the field to lay their eggs on it in instead of the maize.
One farming innovation to improve this sys tem has been systematically to strip harvest the border of napier grass to use as fresh fodder for livestock, which also can graze down the field after the maize is harvested.
Maeda FH, Mtengeti EJ and NA Urio Effects of chopping and addition of molasses on the quality of Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) silage.
In January, EPA issued a proposed rule that identified camelina oil, a form of sugar cane called energy cane, giant reed and Napier grass as potential new fuel sources that met greenhouse gas reduction requirements.
FJLB was prepared from 200 g fresh Napier grass, which was immediately macerated in 1,000 ml of sterilized distilled water with a home blender.
Scientists bred it specifically as an "energy crop," a genre that includes the giant reed Arundo donax, napier grass, switchgrass, and hybrid poplar.
For example: foresters talk about woody biomass, fermentation scientists discuss the latest fermentation process for ethanol production from lignocellulosic material and the pretreatment of cellulose, and agronomists discuss biomass crops like switchgrass and napier grass, while others discuss algae.
Punjab also finalised an MOU with CVC India Infrastructure, Italy to establish five bio-ethanol based refineries based on paddy straw, napier grass and cotton stalks.
It involves the use of three different renewable energy technologies: straight vegetable oil-based electricity generation, dry anaerobic digestion of napier grass, and napier grass-based fuel pellet production.
NPS, excluding Energy Tree, has grown Napier grass as a new source of alternative energy, which it plans to use from 2013 to make sustainable power.
Evidence exists that farmers are not fully aware of the benefits of using such alternative inputs as cassava leaves, sweet potato leaves, giant grass leaves, napier grass, mulberry leaves, Leucana leaves, banana leaves, pawpaw leaves, leftover homestead food (Hecht & Maluwa, 2003) to formulate fish feed and use the water and debris from the pond for production of crops.